Previous events

Here you can find out about previous events organised by History & Policy and our partners. Events are listed in reverse chronological order.

November 2011

Talk from Bas van Bavel: Markets and pre-industrial economic growth: Iraq, Italy and the Low Countries, 6th-18th centuries

Seminar, 3 November 2011, Trinity Hall, University of Cambridge

As part of the Cambridge History Faculty's Economic and Social History seminar series, Professor Bas van Bavel (University of Utrecht) is giving this talk from 17.00. Please click here for more details.

Talk from Oliver Blaiklock: Citizens' Advice Bureaux against bureaucracy: information and advice as a voluntary service in the 1950s

Seminar, 9 November 2011, Strand Building, King's College London

As part of the Centre for Contemporary British History's seminar series, Oliver Blaiklock (King's College London) is giving this talk from 17.00. Please click here for more details.

History & Policy workshop: History in the Headlines

10 November 2011, 10.00-15.30, History Department, King's College, London

This one-day workshop will provide historians with a rare chance to hear from three panels of experienced journalists, documentary-makers, press officers and historians about how to get media coverage for historical research and achieve positive media experiences. Confirmed speakers include Michael Crick (Channel 4 News), Paddy O'Connell (BBC Radio and TV), Chris Bowlby (BBC Radio) and Paul Lay (History Today). Places are free for members of the H&P Network of Historians.

For further information or to book a place, email Mel Porter or download the programme [pdf file: 430KB].

Talk from Eleanor Newbigin: The political economy of democracy: some thoughts on nationhood and citizenship in post-colonial India

Seminar, 10 November 2011, Trinity Hall, University of Cambridge

As part of the Cambridge History Faculty's Economic and Social History seminar series, Dr Eleanor Newbigin (School of Oriental and African Studies) is giving this talk from 17.00. Please click here for more details.

Not just for the record: enlivening archives

11 November 2011, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Enlivening Archives is a one-day workshop aimed at postgraduate students and researchers designed to question the nature of archives and how they are used. The event is hosted by the Centre for History in Public Health at LSHTM. To attend, or for more information, please contact: enlivening@lshtm.ac.uk. There is an charge of £5 for students and £10 for non-students.

Talk from Timothy Hickman: 'Target America': Visual culture, neuroimaging and the 'hijacked brain' theory of addiction

Seminar, 16 November 2011, Tavistock Place, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

As part of the Centre for History in Public Health's seminar series, Dr Timothy Hickman (Lancaster University) is giving this talk from 12.45. Please click here for more details.

The history, role and function of the British High Commission in New Delhi, India

Witness Seminar, 17 November, Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO), London

This witness seminar is organised by the Centre for Contemporary British History @ King's, the AHRC and the FCO. It will be held in the Map Room at the FCO from 13.30-17.00. The seminar will take the form of an interactive group interview with a panel of senior FCO alumni covering 25 years of British representation in India. For further information contact: michael.kandiah@kcl.ac.uk. Please RSVP to Sam Roythorne: s.roythorne@ahrc.ac.uk, tel. 01793 416023. Booking is essential.

Talk from Cormac O'Grada: Living standards, human capital and the Industrial Revolution

Seminar, 17 November 2011, Trinity Hall, University of Cambridge

As part of the Cambridge History Faculty's Economic and Social History seminar series, Professor Cormac O'Grada (University of Dublin) is giving this talk from 17.00. Please click here for more details.

Canada-EU Trade Agreement Conference

Conference, 18 November, Macdonald House, Grosvenor Square

This one-day conference will look in historical context at the negotiations to produce a comprehensive trade agreement between Canada and the European Union (CETA). For full details or to reserve a place, please contact Andrew Smith before 15 November: ab035@coventry.ac.uk.

History and the Royal Mail: Wrangling over Ownership

Lecture, 6pm, 23 November, King's College London

Duncan Campbell-Smith, visiting fellow at the Institute for Contemporary History, will be giving the ICH's Annual Lecture. This will be held in the Great Hall of King's College London. All are welcome to attend.

Talk from Sally Sheard: Agent of change: Brian Abel-Smith and the shaping of global social welfare

Seminar, 24 November 2011, Tavistock Place, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

As part of the Centre for History in Public Health's seminar series, Dr Sally Sheard (University of Liverpool) is giving this talk from 12.45. Please click here for more details.

Talk from Leigh Shaw-Taylor: Economic development and structural change since 1700: new evidence in a global perspective

Seminar, 24 November 2011, Trinity Hall, University of Cambridge

As part of the Cambridge History Faculty's Economic and Social History seminar series, Dr Leigh Shaw-Taylor (University of Cambridge) is giving this talk from 17.00. Please click here for more details.

October 2011

Explaining Cameron's Coalition: How it Happened and What's Happened Since - Institute for Contemporary History Annual Lecture 2011

Lecture, 6pm, 18 October 2011, King's College London

Sir Robert Worcester KBE, DL - founder of MORI, chairman of the Magna Carta 2015 Committee and Fellow of King's College London - will be giving the ICH's Annual Lecture, which will be held in the Great Hall of King's College London. All are welcome to attend.

Talk from Julian Hoppit: The political economy of wool in Britain, 1662-1824

Seminar, 20 October 2011, Trinity Hall, University of Cambridge

As part of the Cambridge History Faculty's Economic and Social History seminar series, Professor Julian Hoppit (University College London) is giving this talk from 17.00. Please click here for more details.

Borderlands as Physical Reality: Producing Place in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries

Conference, 21-22 October 2011, King's College London

Borderlands assumed a particular significance in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and have attracted a good deal of scholarly attention. But we know less about the material reality of borderlands as physical places, territories that were lived in, visited, fought over and otherwise experienced by men and women. This conference seeks to redress the balance, by emphasizing the materiality of borderlands and the ways in which this materiality made possible - or hindered - the making and unmaking of borderlands.

For more details, please click here. To register for the Conference, please email Paul Readman at paul.readman@kcl.ac.uk.

Talk from Conrad Keating: The revolutionary life of Richard Doll

Seminar, 26 October 2011, Keppel Street Building, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

As part of the Centre for History in Public Health's seminar series, Dr Conrad Keating (University of Oxford) is giving this talk from 12.45. Please click here for more details.

Talk from Pat Thane: The making of the National Insurance Act 1911: why the welfare state was invented

Seminar, 26 October 2011, Strand Building, King's College London

As part of the Centre for Contemporary British History's seminar series, Professor Pat Thane (King's College London) is giving this talk from 17.00. Please click here for more details.

History & Policy: Why history matters to international development

Panel discussion, 26 October 2011, King's Building, King's College, Strand Campus

Where did the ideas underpinning policies around public health, education, resource management and social security come from? How did certain ideas, and not others, help shape particular policy responses? How did the content and effectiveness of these interventions vary across different countries?

History brings a unique sensibility to debates about international development policies - assembling, analysing and interpreting different forms of evidence which produces different policy conclusions to those emerging from prevailing approaches.

International development naturally draws on a range of disciplines to inform policy but among the economists, anthropologists, sociologists and social policy specialists, historians are often overlooked. But if history matters for understanding the outcomes of development interventions, then surely historians should contribute to the debates informing such policies.

This panel will examine the contribution a historical sensibility brings to development policy, and to what extent its use has improved development interventions. 18.00, Anatomy Theatre Museum.

Speakers

  • Simon Szreter, Professor of History and Public Policy at Cambridge and co-founder of History & Policy; Simon recently co-edited History, Historians and Development Policy: A Necessary Dialogue (Manchester University Press 2011), with CA Bayly and Vijayendra Rao
  • David Satterthwaite, Senior Fellow, Human Settlements Group; Team Leader, Urban Poverty and Local Organisations, Institute for Environment and Development
  • Keith Hoggart (chair), Vice Principal Arts & Sciences and Professor of Geography, King's College London

This panel is part of King's Arts & Humanities Festival 2011: The power of stories, 24-29 October 2011.

Talk from Jeremy Boulton and Romola Davenport: The transformation of the urban epidemiological regime in north west Europe, 1700-1850

Seminar, 27 October 2011, Trinity Hall, University of Cambridge

As part of the Cambridge History Faculty's Economic and Social History seminar series, Professor Jeremy Boulton (University of Newcastle) and Dr Romola Davenport (University of Cambridge) are giving this talk from 17.00. Please click here for more details.

September 2011

Wild Things: 'Nature' and the Social Imagination - Environmental History Conference

Conference, 16 September 2011, St Antony's College, Oxford

This is an invitation to attend a one-day conference exploring cultural histories of the natural world. Panels range from '"Shooting" the Wildlife: representing nature in visual culture, including photography and film' to 'Economy and Nature: cultural dimensions of natural resource extraction, management and exchange'. Attendance is free of charge.

If you wish to attend, please email Karen Middleton (middleton.karen@talk21.com) or Simon Pooley (simon.pooley@sant.ox.ac.uk). Please click here for more information.

Launch of History, Historians & Development Policy

Book Launch, 29 September 2011, Christie's Bistro, Manchester

The book History, Historians & Development Policy: A Necessary Dialogue, co-authored by H&P partner Simon Szreter, Dr Michael Woolcock, Professor C.A. Bayly and Dr Vijayendra Rao, will be launched on Thursday 29 September 2011. The event is joint between History & Policy, Manchester University Press and the Brooks World Poverty Institute and is being held at Christie's Bistro in Manchester.

We are fortunate to welcome Professor Simon Szreter, Professor of History and Public Policy, University of Cambridge; Dr Michael Woolcock, Senior Social Scientist, Development Research Group (World Bank); and Alison McGovern MP, member of the International Development Select Committee to launch the book and discuss its implications - for the debate about development and for public policy. Light refreshments will be served.

For the first time, this book brings ten leading historians and seven policy advisors together to consider the key challenges in international development - including social protection, public health, public education and natural resource management. It gives rise to policy conclusions rather different to those emerging from prevailing analytical approaches. This event is a chance for those involved in development policy, and those who study it, to look at development from a new angle. Come along to find out more - and to get a discounted copy of the book! Please email sarah.hunt@manchester.ac.uk for more information.

July 2011

Contemporary History: Where are we now? CCBH Summer Conference 2011

Conference, 6-8 July 2011, Anatomy Theatre, Strand Campus, King's College London

Full conference programme
Conference poster

It is 25 years since the Institute of (later Centre for) Contemporary British History was founded by Peter Hennessy and Anthony Seldon. In that time the writing and teaching of contemporary history have expanded dramatically in universities, schools and the media. The recent past considered by contemporary historians has seen great changes, including the development of the European Union, the growth of the internet, the falls and rises of political parties, the impact of decolonisation, globalisation and international financial crises and demographic change, while other aspects of life, such as social, national and regional inequalities may have changed much less.

Contemporary history brings together the makers with the students of history, and tries to break down artificial subject divides in understanding the past and is crucial to understanding the present. This conference will consider the current state of contemporary history in the UK and overseas, bringing together those studying all aspects of the recent past: international relations, economics, gender, diplomacy, politics, religion, education, technology, ideas, the law, society, culture, constitutions and more. It will aim to assess how we are deepening our understanding of the recent past in all its complexity. Please note that all King's students and staff can attend the conference for free.

Highlights include: the Britain and the World Lecture on 'How did the Anglo-American Relationship become essential?' by Professor Kathleen Burk (UCL); and the Ben Pimlott Memorial Lecture by Professor Pat Thane (KCL) on the 'How Britain's 'Big Society' created the welfare state and why we still need both'. These lectures are free and open to all.

Please email ccbhconference@gmail.com to confirm attendance either at the Conference or just at either or both lectures.

Trade Routes, Migration and Cultural Transformation

Workshop, 20 July 2011, Senate House, University of London

Held by the Institute of Commonwealth Studies with a wide range of speakers, this event covers several themes - from the origins of the first Atlantic creole society in Cabo Verde to the power of singing and Estonian identity. The event begins at 1.45pm and finishes at 7pm, with a teabreak.

For details of the programme, please click here. RSVP to troy.rutt@sas.ac.uk.

June 2011

The Parliament Acts Reconsidered

Seminar, 1 June 2011, Institute of Historical Research, London

As part of the Institute for Historical Research's series of seminars, Vernon Bogdanor (KCL) will be introducing this topic. Please click here for more details.

The Royal Mail and the Great Train Robbery of 1963

Lecture, 1 June 2011, Institute of Historical Research, London

The IHR will be holding its annual Fellows' Lecture on 1st June at 6pm in the Wolfson Room. It will be delivered by IHR Senior Fellow Duncan Campbell-Smith, who will speak on 'The Royal Mail and the Great Train Robbery of 1963'. The lecture will be followed by a wine reception. If you would like to attend or have any queries, please contact the IHR Events Office at IHR.Events@sas.ac.uk.

Health and History: Anglo-American Conference 2011

Conference, 29 June-1 July 2011, Brunei Gallery, London

This is the Institute of Historical Research's flagship conference. The history of medicine and of human society in sickness and health is an ever widening window through which the present can view the past. Plenary lecturers include David Arnold, Joanna Bourke, Samuel Cohn, Mary Fissell, Monica Green, Helen King and Paul Starr. A publishers' fair will also be taking place.

For programme and registration details, please click here. For any queries, please contact the IHR Events Office at healthinhistory@sas.ac.uk or on 0207 862 8756.

May 2011

The Search for Security: Food and the Origins of the Second World War

Seminar, 11 May 2011, venue to be announced

As part of the Institute for Historical Research's series of seminars, Patricia Clavin (Jesus College, Oxford) will be introducing this topic. Please click here for more details.

Civilisation and protection: discussions and policy on youth smoking in early 20th century Netherlands

Seminar, 12 May 2011, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London

As part of the Centre for History in Public Health's regular seminar series, Pieter de Coninck (European Commission - Directorate General for Health and Consumers) is giving this talk from 12.45-14.00. For more information, please click here or contact Alex Mold.

Children without a state: meet the author

Meet the author and dicussion, 18 May 2011, United Nations Bookshop, New York

Jacqueline Bhabha, Jeremiah Smith Jr. Lecturer and Director of Research for the François-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights (Harvard University), will discuss and sign copies of Children Without A State, a multi-author volume which examines how statelessness affects children throughout the world from a human rights perspective. Professor Bhabha edited the volume and H&P partner Simon Szreter contributed to it. The event will take place at 13:00 New York time at the United Nations Bookshop: Visitors Lobby, GA-32, 1st Avenue and 46th Street, New York, NY 10017. For more information about the book, please click here.

Leveraging the past: applying the lessons of history to the conflicts of tomorrow (Defence Science & Technology Laboratory: Historical Analysis Symposium)

Symposium, 18-19 May 2011, Portsdown West, Portsmouth

Dstl combines analysis of historical campaigns with developments in academic understanding of conflict to provide a reality check to UK defence policy. This symposium brings together analysts, military historians and international experts to discuss the use of historical resources in understanding topical and enduring defence and security issues. Refreshments will be provided and attendance is free of charge. More information is available here.

40 years on: where are LGBT rights? Gay Liberation Front's 40th anniversary Conference

Conference, 19-20 May 2011, London School of Economics

The Gay Liberation Front was founded in 1971 on the LSE campus. GLF's 40th anniversary is a chance to look back at how LGBT rights have developed and become globalised in this period. This conference brings together academics and activists involved in the development of the global LGBT movement. It will look at the historical context of the development of GLF and include a key note address, panel sessions and more open discussion based sessions. A witness seminar will include key contributors associated with the genesis of GLF in the UK in early 1970s. Please click here for more details.

Talk from Leonore Davidoff

Seminar, 19 May 2011, Pembroke College, University of Cambridge

As part of the Cambridge History Faculty's Modern Economic and Social History seminar, Leonore Davidoff (University of Essex) is giving this talk from 17.00. Attendees are welcome to join for drinks and, usually, dinner afterwards. Please click here for more details.

April 2011

Does Climate Change put a Spanner in the Works of History? A debate between Prof. Penelope Corfield and Dr Mark Levene

Lecture, 1 April 2011, Institute of Historical Research, London

As the scientific evidence mounts on the scale, intensity and immediacy of the biospheric crisis, this debate seeks to explore the degree to which global environmental catastrophe is amenable to traditional historical analysis. Should we be responding to this situation as if it were another of many tides in the human experience? Or is the very nature of the 'now' so unprecedented that it demands a new paradigm in history writing? If so, what meaningful role can historians and academics in related fields play as humans belatedly come to realise that we may be operating at the very edge of history? Please click here for more details.

March 2011

Structural change and the historian: how useful is the concept for an analysis of the post-war "Golden Age" and beyond?

Seminar, 3 March 2011, Pembroke College, University of Cambridge

As part of the Cambridge History Faculty's Modern Economic and Social History seminar, Kim Priemel (Humboldt University Berlin and visiting Feodor Lynen research fellow, University of Cambridge) is giving this talk from 17.00. Attendees are welcome to join for drinks and, usually, dinner afterwards. Please click here for more details.

Time, Funding and Social Science: The British Birth Cohort Surveys of 1946 and 1958

Seminar, 9 March 2011, Institute of Historical Research, London

As part of the Institute for Historical Research's series of seminars, John Welshman (University of Lancaster) will be introducing this topic. Please click here for more details.

"The public must be wooed and enticed with entertainment and buns": BBC programming on mental health issues in the 1950s

Seminar, 10 March 2011, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London

As part of the Centre for History in Public Health's regular seminar series, Vicky Long (Northumbria University) is giving this talk from 12.45-14.00. For more information, please click here or contact Alex Mold.

Why study administrative history when there are many attractive alternatives?

Seminar, 23 March 2011, Institute of Historical Research, London

As part of the Institute for Historical Research's series of seminars, Rodney Lowe (University of Bristol/Cabinet Office) will be introducing this topic. The event also celebrates the publication of the first volume of Professor Lowe's official history of the civil service. Please click here for more details.

February 2011

Brown and the end of New Labour

Seminar, 2 February 2011, Senate House, University of London

As part of the Institute for Historical Research's series of seminars, Anthony Seldon will be introducing his newly published book about Gordon Brown from 17.00. Please click here for more details.

Mechanical labour control and factory discipline in Belgium, England, France, and Italy, 1850-1900: an essay in comparative anthropological history

Seminar, 3 February 2011, Pembroke College, University of Cambridge

As part of the Cambridge History Faculty's Modern Economic and Social History seminar, Alexis Litvine (University of Cambridge) is giving this talk from 17.00. Attendees are welcome to join for drinks and, usually, dinner afterwards. Please click here for more details.

Traffic and Freedom: the Politics of Driving in 1960s Britain

Seminar, 9 February 2011, Institute of Historical Research, London

As part of the Institute for Historical Research's series of seminars, Simon Gunn (University of Leicester) will be introducing this topic. Please click here for more details.

Reconnecting health and safety? Safety education and mass persuasion in twentieth century Britain

Seminar, 10 February 2011, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London

As part of the Centre for History in Public Health's regular seminar series, Mike Esbester (Oxford Brookes University) is giving this talk from 12.45-14.00. For more information, please click here or contact Alex Mold.

The Population Investigation Committee: its history and influence over the last 75 years

Afternoon symposium, 18 February 2011, Wellcome Collection Conference Centre, London

This symposium commemmorates the 75th anniversary of the Population Investigation Committee and celebrates the launch of their historical archives at the Wellcome Library. It will explore the history, influence and contribution of the PIC and its members to demography, covering the social context and development of the PIC and research projects which have significance for the study of epidemiology today. For further details, please click here.

Assets of the dead: the rise of the paper economy in nineteenth-century England and Wales

Seminar, 17 February 2011, Pembroke College, University of Cambridge

As part of the Cambridge History Faculty's Modern Economic and Social History seminar, David R. Green (King's College London) and Alastair Owens (Queen Mary, University of London) are giving this talk from 17.00. Attendees are welcome to join for drinks and, usually, dinner afterwards. Please click here for more details.

Organisational pluralism: reflections on a 'new style' of management of the Linwood car plant, 1967-1981

Seminar, 23 February 2011, Institute of Historical Research, London

As part of the Institute for Historical Research's series of seminars, Alison Gilmour (University of Glasgow/IHR) will be introducing this topic. Please click here for more details.

January 2011

"There is no such thing as a moral expert": Mary Warnock, IVF and the history of bioethics in Britain

Seminar, 20 January 2011, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London

As part of the Centre for History in Public Health's regular seminar series, Duncan Wilson (University of Manchester) is giving this talk from 12.45-14.00. For more information, please click here or contact Alex Mold.

Paradoxes and complexities in British economic and social policy after the Second World War

Seminar, 20 January 2011, Pembroke College, University of Cambridge

As part of the Cambridge History Faculty's Modern Economic and Social History seminar, Glen O'Hara (Oxford Brookes University) is giving this talk from 17.00. Attendees are welcome to join for drinks and, usually, dinner afterwards. Please click here for more details.

Letting women serve at sea: equality debates in the Royal Navy, 1974-1990

Seminar, 26 January 2011, King's College London

As part of the Institute for Historical Research's series of seminars, Kath Sherit (CCBH) will be introducing this topic. Please click here for more details.

November 2010

Meet the archivists

Workshop, 23 November 2010, Canary Wharf, London

The Business Archives Council is holding a workshop in November for postgraduate students and postdoctoral researchers, hosted by HSBC in Canary Wharf. The event will include an archive skills workshop led by eminent business historians, and an archive fair where participants can find out about individual business archives, see examples from collections and discuss research plans with archivists. For further details please visit the event website or join the Facebook group. If you would like to attend, please contact Michele Blagg: Michele.Blagg@Rothschild.com.

Life-cycles seminar

Seminar, 30 November 2010, Institute of Historical Research

Dr. Janet Fink (Open University), 'Lost and Found: Child Abduction and the Representation of Mothers in Postwar British Cinema.' The figure of the lost child is a recurrent and highly visible feature of past and present culture, the concern not only of extensive reporting in the media but also a frequent trope in the cinema, theatre, popular fiction and autobiographical memoirs. This paper is focused upon the ways British feature films of the 1950s and 1960s portrayed the experiences of losing a child through kidnap or abduction, exploring how parents' reactions were represented. However it is particularly concerned with the representations of mothers. Through an examination of the complex and contradictory discourses through which motherhood and the maternal role were constituted in these films, the paper considers what they reveal about the shifting meanings of the mother-child relationship and the dynamics of gender relations in the home and postwar society more generally. The films to be discussed will include Lost (1956), Tomorrow at Ten (1962) and Seance on a Wet Afternoon (1964).

August 2010

You may be interested in the regular seminars organised by History & Policy's partners:

July 2010

Environments

Conference, 1 - 2 July 2010, Institute of Historical Research, London

The Institute of Historical Research's flagship annual event, the Anglo-American Conference of Historians is taking as its theme Environments. Over the last two decades environmental history has developed at an amazing pace, broadening and deepening our understanding of human interaction with nature, climate, landscape and resources across two millennia of historical time. Our conference will explore where environmental history has been and where it is going, its relationship to other scholarly disciplines, and the ways in which historians of the environment can inform global green awareness today. Keynote speakers include: William Beinart, Alfred Crosby, Harriet Ritvo, and Donald Worster and the conference will also host several major book launches over the two days. Within the programme there will be a focus on four strands:-

  • Changing attitudes over time towards the environment (including the animal world)
  • What the historical record and measurement of climate change in past epochs can tell us: for example, seasonality and agriculture, extreme weather events, the oceans and the atmosphere, and the effects of environment on health, material culture and settlement
  • The politics past and present of contested finite natural resources and their sustainability, particularly water, fossil fuels and fisheries
  • The shaping and reshaping of landscape in a historical context (including the built environment)

For further details please see the conference webpage.

Can policy makers today learn from histories of the environment?

Conference session, 1 July 2010, Institute of Historical Research, London

A policy forum will be held as part of the IHR's Environments conference, on 5.45pm on Thursday 1 July in the Beveridge Hall, Senate House. Chair: Paul Warde, UEA. Speakers: Deborah Lamb (Policy Director, English Heritage), Georgina Endfield (Honorary Secretary for Research, Royal Geographical Society), Alastair Fitter CBE (ecologist and Fellow of the Royal Society), Jim Bamberg (author of the official history of BP), Ian Christie (Centre for Environmental Strategy, University of Surrey, Green Alliance and co-author of Church and Earth) and Mark Levene, (founder of Rescue! History). For further details please see the conference webpage.

History in the Headlines: postponed

Workshop, 6 July 2010, Senate House, University of London, London

With apologies for the short notice, this event has now been postponed until Autumn 2010. Please look out for further publicity on this page and via our newsletter and the H&P Network of Historians. If you have any queries about a provisional booking, please contact mel.porter@sas.ac.uk.

Reassessing the Seventies

Conference, 7 - 9 July 2010, Institute of Historical Research, London

The Centre for Contemporary British History summer conference on 'Reassessing the Seventies'. The 1970s marked a watershed in post-war British history with economic crises and profound political and social discord precipitating major social, cultural, political and economic changes with enduring consequences. Three decades after the 'winter of discontent' and the election of Margaret Thatcher, and with the papers now fully open, this major interdisciplinary conference will reassess developments in this crucial decade, placing them in the context of postwar British history as a whole. Subjects covered include the Labour Party, the Conservative Party, devolution, the environment, social policy, civil liberties, economic policy, Empire and decolonisation, women and work, Northern Ireland, trade unions and politics and literature. For further details please see the CCBH website.

Lord David Lea in conversation with Professor Peter Ackers: Industrial Democracy in the 1970s

Conference session, 9 July, Institute of Historical Research, London

The H&P Trade Union Forum will hold this session at the CCBH conference on Friday 9 July, 3.30-5.00pm. David Lea is a former Assistant General Secretary of the TUC and became a Labour life peer in 1999. He was a member of the Bullock Committee on Industrial Democracy 1975-77. Peter Ackers is Professor of Industrial Relations and Labour History at Loughborough University. This session will be chaired by John Edmonds, former General Secretary of the GMB Union and chair of the History & Policy Trade Union Forum.

June 2010

Uses of the past: traditions in contemporary British politics

Conference, 14 June 2010, King's College London

A one-day conference bringing together historians, politicians, political researchers and journalists to rethink our understanding of how political debate relates to historical contexts. Participants will consider how traditions shape present-day political behaviour, and how far are those traditions are invented and deployed to suit political needs today. Speakers include Mark Bevir, David Hall-Matthews, Sunder Katwala, Jonty Oliff-Cooper, Richard Vinen, Jon Wilson and David Willetts MP. For further details, please see the KCL website.

May 2010

Held to account: Political and military leaders should be subject to trial in England for alleged war crimes committed abroad

Debate, 27 May 2010, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, London

A debate chaired by Joshua Rozeberg, organised by the British Friends of Neve Sahlom - Wahat al-Salam Lawyer's Group - in association with IALS. Speakers for the motion: Philippe Sands QC; Joel Bennathan QC; Alex Bates. Speakers against the Motion: Iain Morley QC; Jonathan Kirk QC; Rodney Dixon. The debate will take place on Thursday 27 May at 6pm at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, Charles Clore House, 17 Russell Square, London, WC1B 6DR. For further details please see the IALS website.

Black political activism in Britain, 1900-1965

Seminar, 26 May 2010, Institute of Historical Research

A Contemporary British History seminar led by Marika Sherwood (Black and Asian Studies Association). The seminar will start at 5pm and will take place in the Wolfson Room at the Institute of Historical Research. For further details please see the seminar webpage.

History Postgraduate Conference

Conference, 26 May 2010, University of Huddersfield

The University of Huddersfield History Postgraduate Conference, to be held at the University's main Huddersfield (Queensgate) Campus on Wednesday 26th May 2010, is designed to bring together postgraduates in history and related disciplines to share their research in a friendly, informal environment with the wider postgraduate and history communities. Non-participating attendees are welcome but registration is necessary as space is limited. For more information about the Conference or to register please contact Tosh Warwick or go to the IHR events page.

Free training for doctoral students

Training, 25-26 May 2010, The National Archives, Kew

The successful H&P-TNA workshop, "Using archival sources to inform contemporary policymaking," will be running on Tues 25 - Weds 26 May, at TNA in Kew. Thanks to AHRC-funding the course is free for history (or related) PhD students, including expenses where required, but places are limited. This is an excellent course, with lots of practical tips on getting the most out of the resources at TNA and fascinating case studies from historians whose research is at the sharp-end of current policy issues, including David Edgerton, Sue Onslow, Michael Kandiah, Dennis Wheeler and Philip Withington. There will also be a session on influencing policymakers and the media with H&P External Relations Manager Mel Porter and David Turner of the Health Select Committee, and sessions with expert archivists from the TNA.

For further details and the full programme, please see The National Archives website. If you are interested in attending please email National Archives or contact Ruth Evans for further information.

The Poulson Affair: Corruption and the role of Bankruptcy Law Public Examinations in the early 1970s

Lecture, 21 May 2010, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, London

A lecture by John Tribe (School of law, Kingston University), on the 1970s corruption scandal. It will take place from 5.30 - 7pm on 21 May at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, Charles Clore House, 17 Russell Square, London, WC1B 6DR. This event is organised by IALS in association with the London Legal History Seminar.

April 2010

The Jewish history wars

Lecture, 13 May 2010, Royal Society

The 2010 Elie Kedourie Memorial Lecture is to be given by Professor Simon Schama. For more information please see the British Academy website.

How does Europe in the 21st century address the legacy of colonialsim?

London debates: 13 - 15 May 2010

The second of a series of international debates for outstanding young researchers in the humanities and social sciences. London Debates are discussion workshops at which a subject of broad concern in the humanities and social sciences is debated by a small group of invited senior academics and a selection of early-career researchers.

The competition is open to scholars based in the EU/EEA, who are in their final-year of doctoral study or up to 10 years beyond the award of their doctorate. Successful applicants will be awarded bursaries to cover travel and accommodation.

For more information, please visit the website or contact Rosemary Lambeth rosemary.lambeth@sas.ac.uk.

'Doing Good': Religious conventions and political values in British politics c. 1979 - present.

Seminar, 12 May 2010, Institute of Historical Research

A Contemporary British History seminar led by Liza Filby (Warwick). The seminar will start at 5pm and will take place in the Wolfson Room at the Institute of Historical Research. For further details please see the seminar webpage.

History in schools - a century of debate, 1900 - 2010

Seminar, 6 May 2010, Institute of Historical Research

A History of Education seminar led by Dr Jenny Keating and Dr Nicola Sheldon (History in Education project, IHR). The seminar will start at 5pm and will take place in the Germany Room (formerly the International Relations Room) at the Institute of Historical Research. For further details please see the seminar webpage.

Epidemics, risk and medical responsibility: AIDS and doctors' duty to treat

Seminar, 29 April 2010, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Patrick Wallis (London School of Economics)will deliver a History in Public Health seminar on Thursday 29 April, from 12.45 - 2.00 pm, in room LG 8, Keppel Street Building, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. All are welcome. For further details please contact Alex Mold: alex.mold@lshtm.ac.uk.

Low carbon pasts

Workshop, 29 April 2010

This workshop at the Centre for Adaptive Science at the University of Hull will investigate whether past environmental and energy use might provide "lessons" to current climate change issues, with an objective to develop action plans, encourage research strategies and funding proposals on these topics. Speakers include Professors Lynne Frostick and Greg Bankoff, Co-Directors of CAS, Professor Simon Smith (History Dept), and Dr Jenel Virden (American Studies). If you would like to attend please register by 23 April 2010. For further details and to register please contact Linda Love: L.A.Love@hull.ac.uk.

A model of British manufacturing success: shipbuilding, 1870-1950

Seminar and book launch, 28 April 2010, Institute of Historical Research

A Contemporary British History seminar led by Alastair Reid (Girton College, Cambridge), co-organised with the History & Policy Trade Union Forum. The seminar will mark the launch of Dr Reid's new book: The Tide of Democracy: Shipyard Workers and Social Relations in Britain, 1870-1950 (Manchester University Press). The seminar will be held on Wednesday 28 April 2010, from 5.00 - 6.30pm, followed by a drinks reception. It will take place in the Wolfson Room of the Institute of Historical Research, London, WC1E 7HU. The session will be chaired by John Edmonds, former general secretary of the GMB. If you would like to attend please RSVP to Ruth Evans: ruth.evans@sas.ac.uk 020 7862 8783.

Lessons from the 1930s great depression for the making of economic policy

Conference, 16-17 April 2010, British Academy, Carlton House Terrace

Internationally distinguished economic historians will provide commentaries on the Great Depression and the subsequent recovery during the 1930s. Their emphasis will be on aspects which are relevant to policy making during the current economic crisis. Speakers will address topics such as: the causes of the steep economic decline which began in 1929; the part that bank failures played in the crisis; the reasons for the persistence of mass unemployment; why successful international co-operation was so elusive; the links between the New Deal and economic revival; the role of fiscal and monetary policy; the achievement of bank stability and an assessment of whether policy stimulus was withdrawn prematurely, thus precipitating a further economic contraction. The focus will be on the USA, the UK and on the international economy. Convenors are Professor Nicholas Crafts (Warwick) and Professor Peter Feron (Leicester). For more information, please see the British Academy website.

The Scottish question in the British election: history, policy, personality

Panel discussion, 8 April, 2010, Institute of Historical Research

A History & Policy discussion event on Thursday, 8 April, in the Wolfson Room at the Institute of Historical Research in London from 5.00-6.30pm. Historians Tom Gallagher and Chris Harvie will debate the interplay of history, personality and policy in the Scottish dimension of the forthcoming general election. Tom Gallagher is Professor of Ethnic Conflict and Peace at the University of Bradford and Christopher Harvie is Emeritus Professor at the University of Tuebingen, Member of the Scottish Parliament representing mid-Scotland and Fife and member of the H&P advisory group.

Professor Harvie is the author of 'Broonland: the last days of Gordon Brown' (Verso 2009). See his recent article for the Scottish Review of Books. Professor Gallagher is the author of 'The Illusion of Freedom: Scotland under Nationalism' (Hurst & Co, 2009).

This is an open event, but it would be helpful if you could email Professor Harvie if you plan to attend: chris@chrisharvie.co.uk.

March 2010

Unequal Britain: 60 years of Equalities Policy

Book launch and discussion evening, 25 March 2010, British Academy, London

History & Policy and the British Academy are holding a discussion evening to mark the launch of 'Unequal Britain - Equalities in Britain Since 1945', published by Continuum.



Speakers:

  • Pat Thane FBA, Professor of Contemporary British History, Co-founder of History & Policy and Editor of 'Unequal Britain'
  • Baroness Sally Greengross, Equality and Human Rights Commissioner and Chief Executive of the International Longevity Centre
  • Trevor Phillips OBE, Chair of the Equality and Human Rights Commission
  • Peter Tatchell, Human rights campaigner, coordinator of the LGBT rights group OutRage! and Green Party human rights spokesperson
  • Judith Okely, Emeritus Professor of Social Anthropology, Hull University, Deputy Director, International Gender Studies Centre, Oxford University, and author of The Traveller Gypsies
  • Chair: Rob Berkeley, Director of the Runnymede Trust

The launch will take place on Thursday 25 March, from 7.00 - 8.30pm at the British Academy, 10 Carlton House Terrace, London, SW1Y 5AH. This event is now full but if you would like to be placed on the reserve list please contact historyandpolicy@sas.ac.uk.



See the invitation [pdf file, 200KB]

Legal change on new and controversial medical procedures: the case of contraceptive sterilisation

Lecture, 25 March 2010, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, London

Prof Penney Lewis (KCL Centre for Law and Medical Ethics) will give a lecture on contraceptive sterilisation on Thursday 25 March 2010, 6pm to 7pm at Institute of Advanced Legal Studies. If you wish to attend, please RSVP to Belinda Crothers.

Rethinking the Middle East

Conference, 17-19 March 2010, British Academy, Carlton House Terrace

In analysing the interactions of regional and outside powers, this comparative and interdisciplinary conference will bring together political practitioners and historians, political scientists, and international relations scholars. Keynote lectures will be delivered by Professor Charles Tripp (SOAS) and Professor Erik Goldstein (Boston University). For more information, please see the British Academy website or contact Dr Lars Berger at l.berger@salford.ac.uk.

Inhaling democracy: cigarette advertising and citizenship in West Germany, 1961 - ca.1975

Seminar, 18 March 2010, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Rosemary Eliot (University of Glasgow) will deliver a History in Public Health seminar on Thursday 18 March, from 12.45 - 2.00 pm, in the Lucas room, Keppel Street Building, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. All are welcome. For further details please contact Alex Mold: alex.mold@lshtm.ac.uk.

The British government and oil, 1945-1970s

Seminar, 17 March 2010, Institute of Historical Research

A Contemporary British History seminar led by Charles More (University of Gloucestershire). The seminar will start at 5pm and will take place in the Wolfson Room at the Institute of Historical Research. For further details please see the seminar webpage.

Towards a better tomorrow? The crucial role of social science

Panel discussion, 16 March 2010, British Academy, Carlton House Terrace

Led by Polly Toynbee The Guardian this discussion brings together researchers, government representatives and policy makers to discuss how social science can strengthen its involvement in policymaking, increase its impact and combat potential public expenditure cuts. For more information, please see the British Academy website.

Demos Annual Lecture 2010: Power and Capability - 'Ideas of Justice'

Lecture, 15 March 2010, Hall 1 King's Place

Demos' Annual Lecture 2010, this year a keynote by Nobel Laureate Professor Amartya Sen on 'Power and Capability: Ideas of Justice', with responses from Baroness Shirley Williams, Liam Byrne MP and Aryeh Neier of the Open Society Institute. Please see the Demos website for more information.

Meddlesome bureaucrats and ratepayer democracies: Public health and the public sphere in Victorian England

Seminar, 11 March 2010, University of Cambridge

A Modern Economic and Social History Seminar led by Tom Crook (Oxford Brookes). The seminar will start at 5pm and will take place in the Nihon Room, Pembroke College, University of Cambridge.

Writing national history

Panel discussion, 4 March 2010, British Academy, Carlton House Terrace

This event is a joint British Academy/Oxford University Press panel discussion chaired by David Horspool, History Editor, Times Literary Supplement. The discussion will debate the relevance of 'nationality' as the framework of historical enquiry. Speakers include Professor Sir Brian Harrison FBA, Linda Colley CBE FBA, David Horspool, Richard English FBA and H&P historian, and Rana Mitter. For more details, please see the British Academy website.

Post Office reform - a perennial of British history

Seminar, 3 March 2010, Institute of Historical Research

A Contemporary British History seminar led by Duncan Campbell-Smith (official historian of the Post Office). The seminar will start at 5pm and will take place in the Wolfson Room at the Institute of Historical Research. For further details please see the seminar webpage.

February 2010

Envisioning community: Space, place and translating the past in 19th and 20th century Britain

Conference, 27 February 2010, University of Warwick

Envisioning community is a one-day conference exploring how multidisciplinary approaches to the study of community can better inform our understanding of the historical past. The conference is open to delegates from all disciplines engaging with the processes of space and place in community in nineteenth and twentieth-century Britain. It will build on the challenges wrought by the 'spatial turn' by interrogating spatially related communities: how the inhabitants of the same streets or towns constructed, responded to and used their physical locations to forge a shared sense of identity, or to bring about social and political change. Confirmed speakers include Prof. Nigel Thrift (Vice Chancellor, University of Warwick), Dr Lynne Walker (University of London) and Prof. Elizabeth Edwards (University of Arts, London). For further details please see the conference webpage.

'Sex and the Service Girl': the Royal Air Force's response to the Sex Discrimination Act (1975)

Seminar, 26 February 2010, Institute of Historical Research

A Women's History seminar led by Kathleen Sherit. The seminar will start at 5pm and will take place in the Wolfson Room at the Institute of Historical Research. For further details please see the seminar webpage.

Measurement practices and institutional change in the nineteenth-century British economy.

Seminar, 25 February 2010, University of Cambridge

A Modern Economic and Social History Seminar led by Aasish Velkar (LSE). The seminar will start at 5pm and will take place in the Nihon Room, Pembroke College, University of Cambridge.

The mixed constitution: Monarchical and aristocratic aspects of modern democracy

Lecture, 25 February, British Academy, Carlton House Terrace

Ancient political thought is remarkably modern, or rather, modern political thought has much to learn from the Greek and Roman political thinkers. Mogens Herman Hanson is the speaker at this year's British Academy Annual Lecture. For more information please see the British Academy website.

Presumptive characters: Gladstone, Huxley and the doctrine of development

Seminar, 25 February 2010, Institute of Historical Research

A British History 1815-1945 seminar led by Jonathan Conlin (University of Southampton, and Member of the H&P network). The seminar will start at 5pm and will take place in the Wolfson Room at the Institute of Historical Research. For further details please see the seminar webpage.

Free training for doctoral students

Training, 16-17 February (to be repeated 25-26 May)

The successful H&P-TNA workshop, "Using archival sources to inform contemporary policymaking," will be running on Tues 16-Weds 17 February, at TNA in Kew. Thanks to AHRC-funding the course is free for history (or related) PhD students, including expenses where required, but places are limited. This is an excellent course, with lots of practical tips on getting the most out of the resources at TNA and fascinating case studies from historians whose research is at the sharp-end of current policy issues, including Pat Thane, David Edgerton and Simon Szreter. There will also be a session on influencing policymakers and the media with H&P External Relations Manager Mel Porter and Chris Bowlby of the BBC.

For further details and the full programme for February, see The National Archives website. If you are interested in attending please email National Archives or contact Mel Porter for further information

'Choose your Weapons'. British Foreign Secretaries and their arguments, 1809-2009

Seminar and book launch, 17 February 2010, Institute of Historical Research

A Contemporary British History seminar led by Lord Hurd of Westwell and Edward Young, to mark the launch of their book on this topic. The seminar will start at 5pm and will take place in the Wolfson Room at the Institute of Historical Research. For further details please see the seminar webpage.

Are single-member constituencies out of date?

Workshop, 10 February 2010, Institute of Historical Research

Defenders of Britain's single-member constituency system argue that there is a special and unique relationship between a single member and a constituency. The practice of each constituency electing one MP is a recent innovation. Prior to the Third Reform Act of 1884-85 multi-member constituencies were the norm. Britain is one of the few countries that implemented single-members as part of its journey towards democracy. Part of the reason for this is to be found in the Third Reform Act that first introduced single-members wholesale, despite widespread opposition. The workshop will explore why single-member constituencies were introduced, how the British electoral system has evolved and how it might be reformed in the future. For more information please contact Paul Wilder by 2pm on 5th February on admin@mcdougall.org.uk.

The culture of credit in eighteenth-century New York city

Seminar, 4 February 2010, Institute of Historical Research

An American History seminar led by Simon Middleton (Sheffield). The seminar will take place in the Pollard Room at the Institute of Historical Research, from 5.30 - 7.30pm.

The historical problem of teacher status

Seminar, 4 February 2010, Institute of Historical Research

A History of Education seminar led by Dr Peter Cunningham (University of Cambridge and Visiting Fellow, IOE). The seminar will take place in the Germany Room at the Institute of Historical Research, from 5.30 - 7.30pm.

Tories and hunters: Swinton College in the making of Conservative identities

Seminar, 3 February 2010, Institute of Historical Research

A Contemporary British History seminar led by Laurence Black (Durham). The seminar will start at 5pm and will take place in the Wolfson Room at the Institute of Historical Research. For further details please see the seminar webpage.

Leverhulme Lectures

Lecture series, 1, 3, 8 and 10 February, University of Cambridge

Prof Osamu Saito (Hitotsubashi University, Tokyo) will deliver a lecture series organised in collaboration with the Modern Economic and Social History Seminar. The venue for these lectures is to be arranged. Please see the Cambridge History faculty website for further details.

January 2010

Staging 'The gangs of Manchester': history, drama and dissemination

Seminar, 28 January 2010, University of Cambridge

A Modern Economic and Social History Seminar led by Andrew Davies (University of Liverpool) with Rob Lees, Jill Hughes and Paul Cliff (MaD Theatre Company) . The seminar will start at 5pm and will take place in the Bateman Auditorium, Gonville and Caius College, University of Cambridge. The event is jointly organised with the Public History Seminar convenors.

Re-thinking the British 1970s: towards a new perspective on an orphan decade

Seminar, 20 January 2010, Institute of Historical Research

A Contemporary British History seminar led by Andy Beckett (author of When the Lights Went Out: Britain in the 1970s). The seminar will start at 5pm and will take place in the Wolfson Room at the Institute of Historical Research.For further details please see the seminar webpage.

(Counter) narratives of space and the politics of resistance in a Parisian banlieue

Seminar, 19 January 2010, Birkbeck, University of London

An Urban Studies group seminar led by Dr Gareth Millington and Dr David Garbin from Roehampton University. The seminar series is organised by the Raphael Samuel History Centre. It will take place between 1pm and 2pm at Birkbeck College, University of London, Malet St, London WC1E 7HX. For more details please go to the Raphael Samuel website.

Aberystwyth post-graduate colloquium

Conference, 8 - 9 January 2010, Aberystwyth University

The Department of History and Welsh History at Aberystwyth University will be hosting its 3rd Annual Post-graduate Colloquium on 8th and 9th January 2010. For further details please see the department website.

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December 2009

Competing against segregation: Sport and leisure on a "problem" council estate in South East England since the 1930s

Seminar, 14 December 2009, Institute of Historical Research

Mark Clapson (Westminster) will lead this Sport and Leisure History seminar. It will take place in the Ecclesiastical History Room of the Institute of Historical Research, at 5:15 PM on Monday 27 November. For further information please contact the seminar secretary Dion Georgiou: sportshistory@hotmail.co.uk.

The voluntary sector in 1980s Britain

Witness Seminar, 11 December 2009, NCVO, Regent's Wharf, London

This witness seminar will bring together a number of prominent figures of the 1980s to consider the ways in which the voluntary sector interacted with, and was shaped by, the Thatcher Conservative government. By bringing together key individuals from this period we hope to provoke a round table discussion that will allow contemporaries to discuss their contribution and reflect upon their experiences, and thereby produce a response that is perhaps not captured in the surviving written record of the era. If you would like to attend, please register your interest with Herjeet Marway: h.marway@Bham.ac.uk before Monday 30th November.

Fiction and British politics

Conference, 11 December 2009, British Academy, London

This conference, organised by the Centre for British Politics, University of Nottingham, will be held at the British Academy on Friday 11th December 2009. It will explore the relationship between fiction and British politics, both past and present. It is intended that selected contributions will be published as part of a special edition of Parliamentary Affairs in 2011. For further details please see the call for papers [pdf file, 33KB]. Those interested in presenting a paper should contact Professor Steven Fielding by 25th September 2009 and submit a one page abstract: Steven.Fielding@Nottingham.ac.uk.

"Give and let live": Organ donation campaigns and humanitarianism

Lecture, 10 December 2009, LG 9, Keppel Street Building, London

The fourth and final lecture from the Centre for History in Public Health (London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine) Autumn series presents Ayesha Nathoo from the University of Cambridge. For further details, please contact Alex Mold: alex.mold@lshtm.ac.uk to join the mailing list.

Title tbc

Seminar, 9 December 2009, Institute of Historical Research

A Contemporary British History seminar led by John Campbell (author of biographies of Thatcher and Heath, currently writing a biography of Roy Jenkins). The seminar will start at 5pm and will take place in the Wolfson Room at the Institute of Historical Research. For further details please see the seminar webpage.

Memoryscape: Experiments in using oral history to explore our sense of place

Seminar, 8 December 2009, Birkbeck, University of London

An Urban Studies group seminar led by Dr Toby Butler from the University of East London. The seminar series is organised by the Raphael Samuel History Centre. It will take place between 1pm and 2pm at Birkbeck College, University of London, Malet St, London WC1E 7HX. For more details please go to the Raphael Samuel website.

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November 2009

Making the human gesture: History, sexuality and social justice

Public lecture, 27 November 2009, Bishopsgate Institute

Jeffrey Weeks, Emeritus Professor at London South Bank University, will give the The Raphael Samuel Memorial Lecture 2009, on 'Making the human gesture: History, sexuality and social justice'. The 1970s saw the rise of new social movements engaged with issues of sexuality. Historians inspired by these movements began writing histories of sexual life. This talk traces the development of sexual history since the 1970s, and shows the impact of changing sexual mores on modern attitudes to human rights and social justice. It will take place at 6.30pm, Friday 27th November 2009, at the Bishopsgate Institute, Bishopsgate, London EC2M 4QH (just across from Liverpool Street Station). The lecture is free of charge and open to all, and will be followed by a wine reception. For further details please contact Katy Pettit: K.Pettit@uel.ac.uk.

Lidos and the Lido Movement in Twentieth-Century England

Seminar, 27 November 2009, Institute of Historical Research

Helen Pussard will lead a Sport and Leisure History seminar on the history of lidos. It will take place in the Ecclesiastical History Room of the Institute of Historical Research, at 5:15 PM on Monday 27 November. For further information please contact the seminar secretary Dion Georgiou: sportshistory@hotmail.co.uk.

The legacy of Joan Robinson

Seminar, 26 November 2009, University of Cambridge

A Modern Economic and Social History Seminar led by Geoff Harcourt (Jesus College Cambridge). The seminar will start at 5pm and will take place in the Nihon Room, Pembroke College, University of Cambridge.

From constructive opposition to defiance: London boroughs and Conservative housing policy in the 1970s

Seminar, 25 November 2009, Institute of Historical Research

A Contemporary British History seminar led by Michael Passmore (CCBH/IHR). The seminar will start at 5pm and will take place in the Wolfson Room at the Institute of Historical Research.For further details please see the seminar webpage.

Slavery and the British country house: mapping the current research

Conference, 21 November 2009, London School of Economics

A one day conference exploring the links between the country house in Britain and the Atlantic slave trade. This conference is co-organized by English Heritage, the National Trust and the University of the West of England, and is designed to inform policy around the representation and understanding of historic properties. It will take place at the New Academic Building, London School of Economics on Saturday 21 November. For further details please see the New Academic Building, London School of Economics. For further details please see the conference flyer [pdf] or contact Ros Tatham: 020 7973 3351 or slavery@english-heritage.org.uk.

The most ignored disease in history? Examining the medicalisation of sudden infant death

Lecture, 19 November 2009, LG 9, Keppel Street Building, London

The third lecture from the Centre for History in Public Health (London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine) Autumn series presents Angus Ferguson from the University of Glasgow. For further details please contact Alex Mold: alex.mold@lshtm.ac.uk to join the mailing list.

Britain's Role in the Korean War, 1950-1951, and the impact of the conflict upon the Labour government

Seminar, 17 November 2009, Institute of Historical Research

A Contemporary British History seminar led by Jenna Philips (Cambridge). This seminar will be jointly held with the International History Seminar. The session will be held on Tuesday 17 November, in the Low Countries Room, Institute of Historical Research, 6 - 7.30pm. For further details please see the seminar webpage.

Campaigning in contemporary history: Histories and policies

Conference, 13 November 2009, University of Birmingham

A one-day workshop on 'Campaigning in contemporary history: Histories and policies', organised by the Voluntary Action History Society, supported by the Economic History Society. The event will feature papers from postgraduate and early career researchers working on the contemporary history of campaigning and its impact on social change and on policy. Papers will focus on problems and issues the speakers have come across in their research, which will be considered in a roundtable discussion. The day will feature talks from Professor Duncan Tanner and Professor Pat Thane. For futher details please contact Chris Moores: CIM305@bham.ac.uk.

Less mudslinging and more facts: Water and health in the Medieval English city

Lecture, 12 November 2009, LG 9, Keppel Street Building, London

The second lecture from the Centre for History in Public Health (London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine) Autumn series presents Carole Rawcliffe from the University of East Anglia. For futher details, please contact Alex Mold: alex.mold@lshtm.ac.uk to join the mailing list.

The vagaries of British compassion: Britons, Poles and Jews after World War One

Seminar, 11 November 2009, Institute of Historical Research

A Contemporary British History seminar led by Russell Wallis (RHUL). The seminar will start at 5pm and will take place in the Wolfson Room at the Institute of Historical Research. For further details please see the seminar webpage.

Secret intelligence and modern British history

Robert G. Murray Memorial Lecture, 7 November 2009, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge

Professor Christopher Andrew, Professor of Modern & Contemporary History at Cambridge University, and President of Corpus Christi College, will give the Robert G. Murray Memorial Lecture on secret intelligence and modern British history. It will take place on Saturday 7th November at 2pm in Room 014/16, David Building, Anglia Ruskin University, East Road, Cambridge. If you would like to attend, please RSVP to Holly Clover: holly.clover@anglia.ac.uk.

Spaces of risk and public health: hospital, school and home in Victorian Britain

Seminar, 5 November 2009, University of Cambridge

A Modern Economic and Social History Seminar led by Graham Mooney (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore). The seminar will start at 5pm and will take place in the Graham Storey Room, Trinity Hall, University of Cambridge.

Working Men's clubs, housing estates and community since 1945

Seminar, 3 November 2009, Birkbeck, University of London

An Urban Studies group seminar led by Dr Ruth Cherrington from the University of Warwick. The seminar series is organised by the Raphael Samuel History Centre. It will take place between 1pm and 2pm at Birkbeck College, University of London, Malet St, London WC1E 7HX. For more details please go to the Raphael Samuel website.

From the 18th to the 21st Century: A Perspective on 250 years of British Economic Growth

Ellen McArthur Lecture, 2 November 2009, University of Cambridge

A Modern Economic and Social History Seminar led by Prof N.F.R. Crafts (Warwick University). The seminar will start at 5pm and will take place in Lecture Theatre LG19, Law Faculty, University of Cambridge, West Road, Cambridge.

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October 2009

Financial secretary or arch planner? Enoch Powell and the political economy of the hospital plan

Lecture, 29 October 2009, LG 9, Keppel Street Building, London

The first lecture from the Centre for History in Public Health (London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine) Autumn series presents Tony Smith from Manchester University. For futher details please contact Alex Mold: alex.mold@lshtm.ac.uk to join the mailing list.

New Families for Old: Adoption in Britain in the first half of the twentieth century

Seminar and book launch, 28 October 2009, Institute of Historical Research

A seminar to mark the launch of 'A Child For Keeps: The History of Adoption in England, 1918-45', by Jenny Keating. The seminar is part of the Centre for Contemporary British History's seminar series, and is organised with History & Policy. It will start at 5pm and will take place in the Wolfson Room at the Institute of Historical Research. For further details please see the seminar webpage.

Scotland's global impact: how one small nation changed the world

Conference, 22 - 24 October 2009, Eden Court Theatre, Inverness

30 leading historians will come together in Inverness to discuss, debate and argue about Scotland's contribution to the wider world. The conference will be opened by First Minister Alex Salmond and chaired by the BBC's Lesley Riddoch, and promises to be exciting, entertaining and educational. They'll be joined by battlefield archaeologist Dr Tony Pollard; Professor Graeme Morton, Chair of Scottish Studies at the University of Guelph in Ontario; Professor James Hunter CBE, Director of UHI Centre of History; The University of Aberdeen's Dr Marjory Harper; and singer songwriter Dr Margaret Bennett among many others. The conference will reveal much about the people of Scotland, exploring why they left their country over many centuries and unravelling the huge impact this small nation has made on the rest of our planet. Scotland's Global Impact takes place at Eden Court Theatre and Culloden Battlefield from Thursday 22 to Saturday 24 October. For further details please see the conference programme.

London, the Thames and water: new historical perspectives

Conference, 16 October 2009, Institute of Historical Research

A one-day conference at which historians, archaeologists and geographers will present the results of recent and ongoing research into the inter-twined histories of London and its river, the archaeology of the Thames foreshore and milling, and into the role of water in metropolitan history as both a resource and a flood hazard. For further details, please see the IHR website.

Exposing "the private life of John Bull"? Sex and the popular press in post-war Britain

Seminar, 15 October 2009, University of Cambridge

A Modern Economic and Social History Seminar led by Adrian Bingham (University of Sheffield). The seminar will start at 5pm and will take place in the Nihon Room, Pembroke College, University of Cambridge.

The People's University: The University of London external system, 1858-2008

Seminar, 14 October 2009, Institute of Historical Research

A Contemporary British History seminar led by Dr Michael Kandiah (CCBH) and Christopher Knowles (CCBH). The seminar will start at 5pm and will take place in the Wolfson Room at the Institute of Historical Research. For further details please see the seminar webpage.

History and Policy: new perspectives on today's development priorities from the study of early-modern English history c.1550-1800

Lecture, 14 October 2009, The University of Hull

H&P co-founder Dr Simon Szreter will give the annual St John's College Lecture, at 6pm on Wednesday 14 October, at The Middleton Hall, University of Hull.

Myth truth and nation-state: how do our 'histories' help create our wars?

Public discussion, 14 October 2009, Portcullis House, London

Nationalist history has often been at the heart of justifying wars, ethnic cleansing and genocide. It is therefore of utmost importance to develop an understanding of history which allows for mutual tolerance and which creates more open and playful collective identities. H&P contributor Professor Stefan Berger will explain how a new research programme has underlined the importance of history (school textbooks, public history, popular history, academic history) to nationalist agendas from the late 18thC to the present day. Jeremy Corbyn MP will be contributing to the discussion. It will take place on 14 October, from 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm, in the Grimond Room, Portcullis House, Westminster. For further details, please see the event webpage.

International trade: Who makes the rules?

Public discussion, 13 October 2009, Bishopsgate Institute, East London

Over the last decade international trade talks have successively stalled, been deferred due to immovable impasse, seen stalemate bring meetings to abrupt ends, and finally all-out collapse. Bringing together historical perspectives with the experience of traders and legislators, the event asks:

  • How democratic is the making of multilateral trade agreements?
  • To whom, are international trade legislators accountable?
  • What values underpin international trade law?
  • How do these values resonate within the UK and around the world?

Speakers include Razeen Sally (International political economist, London School of Economics), Frank Trentmann (Historian, Birkbeck), Alan Beattie (World Trade Editor of the Financial Times) and Andrew Halper (Partner and China specialist, Eversheds). The event will be chaired by Lesley Curwen (Presenter of Business Daily on the BBC's World Service). It will take place from 7pm - 9pm and is free to attend. It is organised by the Raphael Samuel History Centre, Bishopsgate Institute and History & Policy, as part of our collaborative series "Knowing the Past, Shaping the Future: History and the Making of Public Policy". For further details please see the Bishopsgate Institute website.

Commonwealth at 60

Lecture, 12 October 2009, The Royal Society, London

Commonwealth Secretary-General Kamalesh Sharma will speak on 'The Commonwealth at 60 - facing the challenges of its times', at a lecture organised by the Institute of Commonwealth Studies. The event will start at 5:30pm on Monday 12 October. Please rsvp to Troy Rutt: Troy.Rutt@sas.ac.uk if you would like to attend.

Roots of global civil society: from the rise of the press to the fall of the wall.

Conference, October 1 - 3, 2009, Cambridge University

The concept of global civil society has gained currency among social scientists and policy practitioners, and the concept has often been seen as emerging with the fall of the Berlin Wall. This conference seeks to trace the origins of 'global civil society' much farther back, drawing on recent scholarship on the history of globalisation, with a particular focus on the internationalism of the 1920s and 1930s. For details about registration and the conference program, please see conference webpage.

September 2009

King coal

Touring film programme, 8 - 30 September 2009, London and Sheffield

King Coal is the first instalment of a major three-year BFI project celebrating the UK's 20th century industrial heritage. Launching in September 2009 in London and Sheffield the turbulent story of coal will be showcased with some remarkable material drawn from the BFI National Archive's documentary and fiction collections with themes ranging from the myth of the miner, domestic and community life, to the agonising battles against pit closures in the 1980s. King Coal comprises a range of elements including cinema screenings and a film programme which will tour nationwide after September. For further details please see the BFI website. If you would like to get involved with promoting and publicising the King Coal season, please contact julia.evans@bfi.org.uk.

Identifying the person: past, present and future

Conference, 26 - 27 September 2009, University of Oxford

This interdisciplinary conference, organised by IdentiNet, will explore identification practices of the past, present and likely future. Attendees will discuss the history and ideas underpinning individual identification and registration, and will consider the implications of historical research for contemporary policy and practice. Speakers include Jane Caplan, Naomi Pfeffer and Simon Szreter. Registration closes on 15 September. For further details please see the conference webpage.

Reassessing the 1970s

Public discussion, 23 September 2009, British Academy, London

Thirty years after the 'winter of discontent' and the election of Margaret Thatcher, this discussion seeks to reassess the 1970s and consider the decade's importance in postwar history. Speakers include Professor Frank Mort, University of Manchester; Professor Jim Tomlinson, University of Dundee; and Professor Pat Thane, FBA, University of London. The discussion will be chaired by Radio 4 presenter Professor Laurie Taylor. The event will start at 7pm on Wednesday 23 September 2009, and will be followed by a drinks reception. It is organised by the British Academy, convened by Pat Thane, Lawrence Black and Hugh Pemberton. For further details please see the British Academy website.

Migrants and diversity: Understanding trends and traditions

Conference, 23 September 2009, University of London

A one-day conference organised by the Institute of Commonwealth Studies, on migrants and diversity. For details pleae see the ICwS events page, or contact Shihan de Silva: shihan.desilva@sas.ac.uk.

Legacies and futures: The History Workshop and radical education

Conference, 19 September 2009, Ruskin College Oxford

This one-day conference will discuss current possibilities for practising radical history-making. Papers will explore democratic scholarship, forms of engagement, what we should learn from the past, and the different roles history can have in local and community activism. Speakers include Dr Anna Davin, editor of History Workshop Journal; Ken Jones, Professor of Education at Keele University; Jorma Kalela, Professor (emeritus) University of Turku; Marjorie Mayo, Professor of Community Development and Head of the Centre for Lifelong Learning and Community Engagement Goldsmiths College, University of London. For further information please see the Ruskin website or email Hilda Kean: hkean@ruskin.ac.uk.

Invasions and transformations

Conference, 15 September 2009, University of Oxford

The annual meeting of the European Association for Environmental History UK Branch, with the European Society for Environmental History, will focus on invasions and transformations. It will include an historical investigation of biological invasions, assessing assumptions about which plants, animals or microbes are 'indigenous' and which are 'alien', and what these distinctions reveal about how we value and use natural resources. It may also include papers on invasions by people, particluarly those caused by changing environmental conditions. The conference will be held at St Antony's College, Oxford, with the support of the Department of African Studies. For more information please contact Simon Pooley: simon.pooley@sant.ox.ac.uk or see the conference webpage.

Gladstone 200 Festival

Festival, 11 - 13 September 2009, St Deiniol's Library, Flintshire, Wales

The Gladstone 200 Festival will celebrate the life and works of the great Liberal statesman through music, art and debate. Dr Ruth Clayton Windscheffel of Oxford University will be giving a lecture entitled 'A Question of Humanity? Gladstone, Armenia and Islam'. Other festival events include a concert by acclaimed Welsh harpist Catrin Finch and a Gladstone 200 Festival Dinner with guest speaker, Lord Roberts of Llandudno. For more information please visit www.st-deiniols.com or email enquiries@st-deiniols.org.

Retailing and distribution history

Conference, 9 - 10 September 2009, University of Wolverhampton

The Centre for the History of Retailing and Distribution (CHORD) invites participants to a conference marking its tenth anniversary. The conference programme includes sessions on markets and retail spaces, the changing local high street, food distribution, consumption and shopping. For further details, please see the conference web-page or email Laura Ugolini: l.ugolini@wlv.ac.uk.

Scandals, crime and corruption

Symposium, 9 September 2009, State Library of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia

This symposium has been organised by the Department of Modern History at Macquarie University together with the History Council of New South Wales and the State Library to celebrate History Week in Sydney, Australia. Join some of Australia's foremost historians for a symposium on this year's theme: Scandals, Crime and Corruption. For further information please see the conference webpage or contact Tanya Evans: tanya.evans@mq.edu.au.

History of science

Festival, 5 - 10 September 2009, University of Surrey, Guildford

The British Science Festival 2009 will feature exciting sessions on the history of science, including a debate on Darwin and a discussion on how scientific uncertainty is represented in the media. For further details please see the History of Science webpage or email Katy Price: katyprice@fastmail.fm.

Communities in conflict: Civil wars and their legacies

Conference, 4 - 5 September 2009, Swansea University

Scholars from the UK, the US, and Europe will discuss the significance of civil wars as defining moments in the life of political communities from ancient times to the present. The conference takes an interdisciplinary approach and themes for papers include: civil wars and political authority in pre- and early modern Europe, civil war and national identity, ethnicity and religion as conflict factors, the social costs of violence, minorities and the war on terrorism, the role of the media and the international community in conflict settlement, "public history" and the commemoration of civil wars. The conference is a joint venture by the Swansea School of Humanities and the German Historical Institute in London. The key note speaker is Professor Caroline Hartzell, Gettysburg College, PA. For the conference program, registration form and further information please visit the conference website or contact Regina Poertner: R.Poertner@swansea.ac.uk.

August 2009

Gender and loss: Experiencing widowhood in Britain and continental Europe, c.1400-1900

Conference, 26 - 28 August 2009, Bath Spa University

This conference, sponsored by the Centre for the History of Gender and the Urban Experience at Bath Spa University, will explore the historical experience of widows and widowers between 1400 and 1900. The conference aims to foster an international dialogue and create a network of scholars interested in exploring the ways that men and women coped with the loss of a spouse and how their experiences of widowhood were shaped by gender, place and space. For further details please contact Dr. Elaine Chalus: e.chalus@bathspa.ac.uk.

July 2009

Televising history 2009

Conference, 22 - 25 July 2009, Lincoln

A diverse, and interdisciplinary, international 3-day conference open to media professionals, archivists, museum professionals and scholars, with papers given on the broad themes of representing the past on TV and in other fora. The conference forms part of the Televising History 1995-2010 AHRC-funded research project. Dr David Starkey has been confirmed as keynote speaker, and Prof Pierre Sorlin (Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris); Prof Jay Winter (Yale University); Prof John Corner (University of Liverpool) and Dr Alison Landsberg (George Mason University) are confirmed plenary speakers.The deadline for proposals, to be submitted to conferences@lincoln.ac.uk, is 1 April 2009. We would be grateful if you could keep abstracts to a maximum of 150 words. Please contact Erin Bell ebell@lincoln.ac.uk or Ann Gray agray@lincoln.ac.uk with any questions.

Fertility declines in the past, present and future: what we don't know and what we need to know

Conference, 15 - 17 July 2009, University of Cambridge

This conference will bring together representative demographers, economists, historical demographers, evolutionary biologists and anthropologists to discuss fertility change. It will take place at the Cambridge Group for the History of Population, Department of Geography and Downing College, Cambridge. For further details please see the conference website.

The Gladstone bicentenary international conference 2009

Conference, 5 - 8th July, University of Chester in association with St Deiniol's Library.

This conference will commemorate the bicentenary of William Ewart Gladstone, Liberal statesman and four times Prime Minister, and will explore his life and achievements, from his relations with Queen Victoria to his stance on Irish Home Rule, the working classes and America. The conference will open with a public lecture by Professor Frank Turner of Yale University on Sunday July 5th entitled, Why does Gladstone still matter, or does he? The guest speaker will be Lord Asa Briggs. The conference is being organised by Professor Roger Swift, Emeritus Professor of Victorian Studies at the University of Chester, and newly appointed Fellow of St Deiniol’s Library. For further details visit the conference website or email r.swift@chester.ac.uk.

The British revolution in the English provinces, 1640-9

Lecture, 6 July 2009, Birkbeck, University of London

Professor John Morrill, FBA, Professor of British and Irish History at Cambridge will deliver Victoria County History's 2009 Marc Fitch Lecture, chaired by Miles Taylor, Director of the IHR. The lecture will take place on 6 July at 6.30pm, at the Clore Management Centre, Birkbeck, University of London, and will be followed by a reception at the IHR Common Room, Senate House. For further details please contact Neil Penlington: neil.penlington@sas.ac.uk.

Hearing voice in oral history

Conference, 3 - 4 July 2009, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow

The Oral History Society's 2009 conference will explore an essential aspect of oral history, voice, and will include keynote speeches from Professor Steven High, Anne Karpf and Rab Wilson. For more information please go to the conference webpage.

Multicultural London: Past, present and future

H&P session at Anglo-American Conference, 2 July 2009, Institute of Historical Research

H&P's session at this year's Anglo-American Conference of Historians on Cities will take place on Thursday 2 July from 4.45 to 6.00pm when a respected panel of experts will explore 'Multicultural London: Past, present and future'. Speakers: Rob Berkley, Director of the Runnymede Trust, H&P contributor and Local Government Ombudsman Jerry White, Kate Gavron, Trustee of the Young Foundation and co-author of The New East End. Kinship, Race and Conflict. The discussion will be chaired by Wesley Kerr, broadcast journalist and Chair of Heritage Lottery Fund's Committee for London.

Subscribers to the H&P Newsletter can attend the Multicultural London session free of charge, please contact Ruth Evans to register. To subscribe to H&P's newsletter click here.

Anglo-American Conference of Historians 2009: Cities

Conference, 2 - 3 July 2009, Institute of Historical Research

For 10,000 years cities have shaped the affairs of mankind. Now, more than half of the world's population is urban, dwelling in settlements that we identify as 'city' or 'town', some of them so extensive and so complex that they seem to transcend traditional notions of urban organisation and form. The conference will deal with cities throughout the world, with papers examining the networks of cities and their role in cultural formation, the relations between cities, territories and larger political units, the ideologies and cosmologies of the city and what distinguishes the city or town from other forms of settlement or ways of life. The conference will feature plenary lectures by Wim Blockmans, Swati Chattopadhyay, Lynn Hollen Lees and Derek Keene. For further details and to register, please see the IHR website.

History of nursing

Workshop, 2 - 3 July 2009, University of Exeter

This workshop aims to bring together researchers from all areas of the history of nursing, with emphasis on the period after 1850. The intention is to explore relatively neglected topics within what is currently a vibrant and expanding historiography. The workshop is designed to support networks of scholars and develop opportunities for publication. For further details please see the Exeter Centre for Medical History website.

June 2009

The Thames Gateway: aspirations materialised?

Witness seminar, 29 June 2009, Queen Mary, University of London

The area of London now called Docklands was once a thriving industrial heartland. In the 1960s the area slipped into long-term economic decline, before a programme of reinvestment in the 1980s with the London Docklands Development Corporation (LDDC). This witness seminar will evaluate the LDDC and its results, hearing from key decision makers of the period including: politicians; LDDC members; architects and officials. The seminar will be chaired by Peter Riddell (of The Times). It aims to inform the ongoing discussion about regeneration in east London, by ensuring that the area's history is recognized and incorporated into future development plans. This event organised by Queen Mary, Univerity of London and Eastside Community Heritage as part of the Working Lives of the Thames Gateway project. It will take place on Monday 29 June, 1.30-5.30pm, at the Arts Lecture Theatre, Arts Building, Queen Mary, University of London, E1 4NS.

John Archer and Black Edwardians

Conference, 27 June 2009, London

The Black & Asian Studies Association Conference will take place on Saturday 27 June, 2.30pm - 5pm at the Providence House Youth Club, 138 Falcon Rd, London, SW11 2LW (Tube: Clapham Junction). The conference will include a session by Sean Creighton on John Archer, Battersea's black Progressive Mayor from 1913-14, a campaigner for black rights/colonial freedom, and a leading Labour activist. It will also feature the following speakers: Jeff Green - "Do we really know Samuel Coleridge-Taylor?"; David Killingray - "The 1900 Pan African Conference"; and Caroline Bressey - "White women and Black History: The case of Catherine Impey". For further details please see the conference webpage, or email sean.creighton@btinternet.com.

Britain and the Cold War

Conference, 22 - 25 June 2009, Centre for Contemporary British History (IHR), London

The 23rd Summer Conference of the Centre for Contemporary British History will focus on Britain and the Cold War. It will feature the following plenary sessions: Kathleen Burk (UCL), 'Reflections on Anglo-American relations during the Cold War'; Gill Bennett (FCO historian), 'The legacy of 1945: How the end of World War II determined British policy in the Cold War'; Klaus Larres (University of Ulster), 'Britain and the Cold War: A structural analysis'; Robert Bud (The Science Museum), 'When science was natural: the freezing of the concepts of 'pure' and 'applied' in Cold War environments'; Anne Deighton (Oxford), 'Britain and the cold war: the state of the art'; Nina Fishman (University of Swansea), 'British Trade Unions in a Cold War climate, 1948-68'; Tony Shaw (University of Hertfordshire), 'Cinema and the Cold War: An International Overview'. The conference will also include a witness seminar on 'British Bomber Command and the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis'. The conference will take place from 22-25 June 2009 at the Institute of Historical Research, London. For further details please contact Virginia Berridge: virginia.berridge@sas.ac.uk.

Lord Hurd in conversation with David Reynolds: The formulation of British policy at the end of the Cold War

H&P discussion, 22 June 2009, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

The Rt Hon Lord Hurd of Westwell was Foreign Secretary from 1989 to 1995. He will discuss the formulation of British policy at the end of the Cold War with Professor David Reynolds, Professor of International History and Fellow of Christ's College, Cambridge. It will take place on Monday 22 June, 5:45pm, at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Registration is essential; if you would like to attend please email Ruth Evans: ruth.evans@sas.ac.uk or call 020 7862 8781.

This event is part of the Britain and the Cold War conference, organised by the Centre for Contemporary British History.

Unmarried mothers in England, 1970 - 2009: Past, present, future

Seminar, 17 June 2009, University of Warwick

This seminar will bring together historical and policy perspectives on unmarried motherhood in England since the 1970s. H&P co-founder Pat Thane will discuss the historical position of unmarried mothers during this period and Dr Geraldine Brady (Coventry University) will speak about local policy responses to young unmarried mothers in Coventry. The seminar will take place on Wednesday 17 June from 4 - 6pm, at the Wolfson Research Exchange, University of Warwick. For further information please contact April Gallwey: A.G.Gallwey@Warwick.ac.uk.

The cost of war

Conference, 17 - 20 June 2009, Liverpool Hope University Campus, Liverpool

The first international conference of the Desmond Tutu Centre for War and Peace will document the harmful costs of wars, conducting a comprehensive interdisciplinary investigation which will focus particularly on the war in Iraq. For further information, please see the conference website.

Invasions and transformations

Conference, 16 June 2009, St Antony's College, University of Oxford

An Environmental History Meeting on all aspects of invasions and transformations. For further details please see the conference webpage.

Are today's researchers equipped for the digital future?

Discussion, 8 June 2009, British Academy

This event will explore issues which the digital revolution is raising for the research community, particularly in the humanities and social sciences. These will include the new opportunities digital tools offer researchers; the impact of the digital revolution on research and teaching (both positive and negative); the impact for public and university libraries, especially at a time of unprecedented budgetary pressures; the kinds of investment in and support for digital technology the UK requires in order to sustain its world-leading position in research; the specific implications of the digital future for intellectual property and copyright; and whether Government policy is taking sufficient cognisance of all of these challenges. Speakers: Baroness Onora O'Neill, CBE, PBA, President, British Academy; Dr Joanna Newman, British Library; Professor Kevin Schurer, University of Essex; Professor Bob Bennett, FBA, University of Cambridge. The discussion will take place from 7.00pm - 8.30pm, on Monday 8 June 2009, and will be followed by a drinks reception. For further details please see the British Academy website.

Using archival sources to inform contemporary policy debates

AHRC Collaborative Research Training Scheme, 3 - 4 June 2009, The National Archives

This knowledge transfer programme aims to provide doctoral students with training in how to identify and use archival sources in their research, and to consider how history can be used to inform contemporary policy debates and develop good practice in policymaking and implementation. Speakers include Professor Pat Thane; Professor Steve Hindle; Dr Sue Onslow; Professor David Edgerton; Dr Hugh Pemberton; Radio 4 producer and presenter Chris Bowlby and H&P external relations manager Mel Porter. The programme has been jointly developed by The National Archives, History & Policy and members of the Centre for Contemporary British History and is supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). For further details please go to the TNA website.

May 2009

Britain's second Labour Government, 1929-31: A reappraissal

Conference, 29 May 2009, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge

This conference will mark the eightieth anniversary of the election of Ramsey MacDonald's Government in 1929. This will be the first conference of the newly formed Labour History Research Unit at Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge. The Unit will promote new thinking and research into the history of both the Labour Party and Britain's labour movement more generally. For more information please contact Professor John Shepherd: john.shepherd@anglia.ac.uk

The power of analogy: The post-cold war world in historical perspective

Public lecture, 23 May 2009, London School of Economics

Prof. Niall Ferguson, the Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History at Harvard University and William Ziegler Professor at Harvard Business School, will give this public lecture at 6pm on Saturday 23 May 2009, at the Old Theatre, Old Building, London School of Economics.To book a place, email Dr David Monger: crossroadsconference09@yahoo.co.uk.

Faith & public life

Conference, 23 May, Liverpool Athenaeum Club

Lord Roberts of Llandudno, Gerald Kaufman MP and Mr Zia Chaudhry will be the key note speakers at this event organised by St Deiniol's Library, as part of the bicentenary celebrations of William Gladstone. To book a place contact Rachel Hoy: admin@theathenaeum.org.uk or call 0151 709 7770. For more information about St Deiniol's Library, the national memorial to Gladstone, please visit the website.

Writing the history of the global

Conference, 21 - 22 May 2009, British Academy, London

2009 marks a decade of new historical writing which has recently come to be termed 'global history'. Debates over 'globalization' and paradigms such as the 'great divergence' stimulated historians in many specialisms to think about the historical formation of these phenomena. Just how unique, how distinctive, is our current condition of an intense interlinking of economies and polities? We are now re-thinking our histories in relation to those of others in wider parts of the world. The 'global' in history-writing emerged from postmodernist and postcolonial directions where 'crossing boundaries' and 'beyond borders' joined the aspirations of 'new imperial history' and comparative studies of the West and the East. Since then many historians have pursued wider concepts of 'connectedness' or of 'cosmopolitanism' as these have developed in social theory. Many are now trying to move beyond unilateral comparisons contrasting Europe with China, or Europe with India - and are investigating linkages and interactions across the world. These histories also carry many limitations: they have been predominantly economic and political or histories of internationalism. They have not escaped the constraints of the 'big questions' and 'grand periodization' of issues like the 'rise of the West', the 'sources of the great divergence' or the 'crisis of empires'. They raise real questions of how we move from the global to the local, and the methods by which we carry out our research. There are serious questions of language and technical expertise. For further details please see the British Academy website.

The significance of contemporary history as the bridge between historical scholarship and society: The case of Britain and Ireland

Lecture, 22 May 2009, King's College London

Lord Bew, an independent crossbench peer and Professor of Irish Politics at Queen's University, Belfast, will give this public lecture at 6.15pm, on Friday 22 May 2009, at the Edmond J. Safra Lecture Theatre, Strand Campus, King's College London. To book a place, email Dr David Monger: crossroadsconference09@yahoo.co.uk.

Meltdown! Financial crises, past and present

Public discussion, 15 May 2009, Institute of Historical Research, London

Historians discuss the current financial crisis in the light of previous economic 'meltdowns'. This discussion will be held in the Wolfson Room, Institute of Historical Research, London, on Friday 15 May 2009, 5.00-7.00 pm, at the Institute of Historical Research. Speakers are Patricia Clavin (Oxford), Peter Cain (Sheffield Hallam), Adam Tooze (Cambridge), and Jan Toporowski (SOAS). This event is open to all, no tickets or booking required. It is part of a series, 'Conversations and Disputations', sponsored by the RSHC and the IHR.

For more information, please email k.pettit@uel.ac.uk, or visit the RSHC website.

The politics of reproductive health in post-WWII Scotland

Seminar, 14 May 2009, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Gayle Davis, of the University of Edinburgh, will give this seminar at the Centre for History in Public Health, at the LSHTM. It will take place on 30th April 2009, from 12.45 pm - 2.00 pm, in The Lucas Room (LG 81), Keppel Street Building. All are welcome. For further details please contact Ingrid James.

A new way for government

Lecture, 11 May 2009, London School of Economics

Sir Michael Bichard KCB will give a talk followed by a discussion with the audience, at 6pm on Monday 11 May. For more information, email mpapublicpolicy@lse.ac.uk or call 020 7107 5234.

Towards an oral history of 1968 in France

Seminar, 9 May 2009, Ruskin College, Oxford

Professor Robert Gildea (University of Oxford) will discuss the events of 1968 in France, from an oral history perspective. It will take place on Saturday 9 May coffee at Ruskin College, Walton Street, Oxford, 0X1 2HE. The group meet for coffee at 10.30am, with the session starting at 11am and finishing by 1pm. For further details please see the Ruskin website or contact Dr Hilda Kean: conference webpage.

The Two Cultures: 50 years on

Public discussion, 5 May 2009, the Royal Society

In May 1959, the British scientist and novelist C P Snow delivered his influential Rede Lecture on 'The Two Cultures'. Its central argument was that a breakdown of communication between the two cultures of modern society - the sciences and the literary - was holding back our ability to tackle the world's problems. The term 'two cultures' persists as shorthand for the notion that there is a damaging rift between science and other types of knowledge. Fifty years on, the Royal Society is hosting a public debate to revisit the two cultures argument and assess its applicability to our situation today.

Chair: Lord Melvyn Bragg; Speakers: Professor Stefan Collini FBA, Professor of Intellectual History and English Literature, University of Cambridge, Rt. Hon John Denham MP, Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills, Sian Ede, Arts Director, Gulbenkian Foundation, Professor Marcus du Sautoy, Simonyi Professor of the Public Understanding of Science, University of Oxford.

The discussion will take place at 6.30 pm on Tuesday 5 May. For more information please visit the Royal Society website.

April 2009

Alcohol and the social relations and regulation of mobility in C20th Britain

Seminar, 30 April 2009, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Bill Luckin, of the University of Bolton, will give this seminar at the Centre for History in Public Health, at the LSHTM. It will take place on 30th April 2009, from 12.45 pm - 2.00 pm, in Room 101, 49 Bedford Square. All are welcome. For further details please contact Ingrid James.

Medicine and healthcare: History and context

Conference, 16 - 18 April 2009, Dublin

This postgraduate conference is organised by the Society for the Social History of Medicine. Papers will contextualize the history of medicine and healthcare in political, military and policy history, economic and social history, local, national and global history, and the history of work and professionalisation. For further details please see the SSHM website.

Insurance, sickness and old age: past experiences and future prospects

Conference, 15 - 16 April, University of Southampton

The conference will include papers on the experience of old age in past times, the relationship between sickness and ageing, the role of voluntary and commercial insurance organisations in supporting people through sickness and old age, the development of statutory health insurance, and current work on the health status of elderly people in different countries (including their availability for work). You can find out more by visiting the conference website. If you would like to attend, please complete the registration form at the bottom of the conference web page and return it to Angela Westley: a.g.westley@soton.ac.uk.

Crises and the City

Conference, 2 - 3 April 2009, Warwick

This conference will explore the concept of urban crises, considering how individuals and institutions respond to such events. Papers include: Civic identity and the impact of war; Survival strategies: individual and institutional responses; Poor children, population pressure and personal crisis in 18th and 19th century towns; Strategies for urban recovery; Reforming urban space; and War and reconstruction in post-World War II European cities. For further details please email Dr David Green (conference organiser) david.r.green@kcl.ac.uk.

Madness in the system

Knowing the past, shaping the future: history and the making of public policy

Public discussion, 2 April 2009, London

Why has consensus on the mental health law been so difficult to reach over the last 25 years? What is the purpose of mental health law today? To what extent does it protect or compromise people's rights? In what ways are historical definitions of mental illness and mental health being redefined today? What has been lost and gained in the substitution of the asylum with hospital and community care? This event brings together historians of madness and mental health law, with mental health policy makers, regulators and monitors, psychotherapists, and mental health service users to talk about mental health in the system, past and present. It is organised by the Raphael Samuel History Centre (University of East London/Birkbeck College/Bishopsgate Institute www.raphael-samuel.org.uk), in partnership with History & Policy. For further details email Katy Pettit: k.pettit@uel.ac.uk.

Coming home? Conflict and return migration in twentieth-century Europe

Conference, 1 - 3 April 2009, University of Southampton

The question of return has long been thought to be central to an exilic discourse and yet relatively little is known about how return migration is actually experienced and subsequently remembered by exiles and also by migrants more widely. In order to mark the 70th anniversary of the 'official' end of the Spanish Civil War and the start of the Second World War this conference will examine events which led to the mass displacement of refugees. The event will take place from 1 - 3 April 2009, at the University of Southampton. For further details, please see the conference webpage.

Race and the modern world

Conference, 1 - 3 April 2009, Goldsmiths University of London, and the Stephen Lawrence Trust, London

This international and multidisciplinary conference is especially concerned with the race discourses still fundamental to the ways in which modern society and culture thinks itself. Papers will be given on all aspects of race and modernity - how 'races' are imagined and represented, in biological, linguistic, gendered and spiritual terms; what anxieties and desires are expressed in or projected onto racialised figures; how individuals in modern societies and cultures relate themselves to the collective identities posited by race discourse. With panels on such areas as diasporas, multiculturalism, faiths and civil society, race and representation, urban design and youth cultures, the conference aims to engage not just with academics, but also with the wider community and with particular reference to young people in local schools and colleges. For further details please see the Goldsmiths website.

March 2009

What is public history today?

Public discussion, 27 March 2009, Institute of Historical Research, London

Historians discuss the current state of public history and how it should develop in the future. This discussion will be held in the Wolfson Room, Institute of Historical Research, London, on Friday, 27th March 2009, from 5.30 to 7.30pm. Speakers: Patrick Wright (Nottingham Trent), Hilda Kean (Ruskin College, Oxford), John Siblon (City and Islington College), and Toby Butler (Raphael Samuel History Centre). It will be chaired by Barbara Taylor (Raphael Samuel History Centre). The session will also celebrate the launch of two books: People and their Pasts: Public History Today, Edited by Hilda Kean and Paul Ashton, and On Living in an Old Country by Patrick Wright. This event is open to all, no tickets or booking required. For more information, email k.pettit@uel.ac.uk, or visit the RSHC website.

Social movements and ideas: Multidisciplinary explorations of socio-cultural change

Reading group, Tuesday 31 March, 2009, University of Manchester

This new reading group will explore the role of social movements in cultural change, aiming to bridge disciplinary boundaries and literature-specific languages about movements, ideology, and culture. It will meet on Tuesday 31 March, Tuesday 28 April and Tuesday 26 May, at the University of Manchester. For further information, please see the flyer [pdf file, 25KB] or contact Pedro Ramos Pinto: pedro.ramospinto@manchester.ac.uk.

The medicalisation of cannabis

Witness seminar, 24 March 2009, The Wellcome Trust, London

Throughout its history, cannabis has been both an illicit drug and a licit medicine. The discovery of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in 1964 increased scientific research into cannabis, focusing mainly on the problems associated with it, though research also suggested that it could be used to treat glaucoma and the nausea associated with cancer treatments. In the 1990s research on medical uses entered the mainstream. A number of MRC funded trials investigated its therapeutic effect on multiple sclerosis and postoperative pain, and a UK pharmaceutical company was created to investigate whole plant extracts. Yet problems over administration methods and outcome measures, and mental health fears, mean that the medicalisation of cannabis is still contentious. This Witness Seminar will bring together some of the scientific pioneers and investigators of cannabis and those involved in recent trials and the commercial developments of cannabis compounds. The meeting will be chaired by H&P founder Virginia Berridge and Tilli Tansi of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. For further details, please see the LSHTM website.

The voluntary sector in British society

Workshop, 20 March 2009, The British Academy, London

This workshop will examine the historical role of the British voluntary sector. It will bring together academics from historical, political science, social policy and sociological backgrounds, to consider the role of voluntarism and voluntary associations in British society, since the late Victorian period. The day will consist of a series of papers, followed by a round-table discussion. It is convened by H&P founder Pat Thane and the organisers of the NGOs in Britain project at the University of Birmingham. The workshop is free to attend but booking is required. For further information please see the British Academy website.

Darwin's Luck

Conference, 22 March 2009, St Deiniol's Library, Flintshire

St Deiniol's Library – the national memorial to William Gladstone – is hosting a half-day conference to discuss Darwin's life and works during the bicentenaries of the two great Victorians. Speakers include: Professor Patrick Armstrong, Adjunct Associate Professor at Edith Cowan University in Western Australia, author of Darwin’s Luck; Andrew Allott, Head of Biology at Shrewsbury School; Dr Stephen Lewis, Senior Lecturer in Biological Sciences at the University of Chester. For further details please see the St Deniols website. To book call 01244 532350 or email deiniol.annette@btconnect.com.

February 2009

Public history

Workshop, 28 February 2009, Roehampton University, London

A one-day workshop on current and future trends in Public History in Britain and Europe. Speakers include H&P founder Alastair Reid, Geoffrey Cubitt, Jill Liddington, Sally Alexander and John Tosh. For more information please contact Sandra Rugea: rugeas@roehampton.ac.uk.

Convention on modern liberty

Convention, 28 February 2009, Institute of Education, London (and other UK locations)

The Convention on Modern Liberty will discuss the state of fundamental rights and freedoms in the UK. Individuals, groups and organisations from across the political spectrum will raise their concerns. Speakers include Philip Pullman, Shami Chakrabarti, Nick Clegg MP, David Davis MP, Will Hutton, Lord Bingham, Simon Jenkins, Helena Kennedy QC, Moazzam Begg, Linda Colley and several H&P historians. For more information please go to the Modern Liberty website.

Fighting poverty and inequality in an age of affluence

Conference, 21 February 2009, LSE, London

Beatrice Webb's 1909 Minority Report to the Poor Law Commission first set out the vision, arguments and values of social justice that were to become the foundations of the modern welfare state. This conference will commemorate the centenary of the Minority Report and consider how its key insights could be renewed and applied today. Speakers include Roy Hattersley, Dr. Dianne Hayter, Karen Buck MP, Nick Bosanquet, Hetan Shah, Sian Berry, Barry Knight, Pat Thane and Peter Townsend. For further information please go to the LSE website.

War Crimes - retrospectives and prospects

Conference, 20 - 21 February 2009, London

A group of specialised speakers will debate the issues surrounding jurisdiction, the media and war crime trials. Using specific case studies as examples, the implications of recent trials will be examined. Do prosecutions serve justice? Speakers include Lesley Abdela, David Fraser, Michael Kandiah, Frank McDonough, Hans Pawlisch, David Seymour and David Sugarman. The conference will take place at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies at the University of London. For further details please see the IALS website, or email Belinda Crothers: belinda.crothers@sas.ac.uk.

Conflict and collaboration: women's liberation movements in historical and comparative perspective

Conference, 13 February 2009, London

This colloquium seeks to document and analyse the Women's Liberation Movements (WLMs) of the 1970s. Women's Liberation created new networks for political and personal collaboration that aimed at redressing disparities in women's pay, social status and professional opportunity, and sought to transform personal life and intimate relationships. Pioneering feminist theory emanating from WLMs brought issues of sexuality, reproduction, the family, race, and violence to the attention of women and men in dozens of countries. By the 1980s, though, WLMs had fragmented, and noticeable factions within feminism replaced its earlier unity and sense of purpose. This colloquium will feature discussions of the significance and impact of WLMs in England, Norway, Scotland, and the United States. The event is to be held at the Birkbeck Institute for Social Research and for further information about the speakers and the venue, contact Jeska (jeska.rees@gmail.com) or visit the for registration information.

January 2009

The 'Winter of Discontent' in British politics

Discussion, 22 January 2009, British Academy, London

Held on the 30th anniversary of the first public sector 'day of action' during the winter of discontent, this discussion evening will consider the causes and consequences of the conflict and its continued resonance in British politics. The panel includes Lord Baker (former Conservative Home Secretary), Professor Colin Hay (University of Sheffield), Lord Lipsey (Special Adviser to the Prime Minister 1977-79 and political journalist) and John Monks (former General Secretary, TUC). The evening will be chaired by Peter Riddell (Chief Political Commentator of the Times and Senior Fellow of the Institute for Government) and is convened by H&P historians Pat Thane, Laurence Black and Hugh Pemberton. It will be held at the British Academy from 7pm to 8.30pm, followed by a drinks reception. For further details please see the British Academy website.

"The New East End": Immigration, history and the city

Lecture, 20 January 2009, Birkbeck College, London

Dr David Feldman will talk about his research on the history of migration and welfare in relation to issues raised in Geoff Dench, Kate Gavron and Michael Young's The New East End: Kinship, Race and Conflict (2006). This will be the first meeting of the Birkbeck Urban Studies Group, which is convened by the Raphael Samuel History Centre. It will take place on 20 January 2009, from 1-2 pm, in Room 631, Birkbeck College, Malet Street, London.

History and sustainability: environmental history and education for sustainable development

Symposium, 10 January 2009, University of East Anglia

This event will examine and provide exemplars of the role environmental history can play in contemporary thinking about sustainability and environmental change. A mixture of discussions and short papers will provide introductions to key themes in the field, historical perspectives on current policy issues, and pointers educational best practice, resources for university courses, schoolteachers and others interested in the field. Speakers will include David J. Starkey, Kate Showers and Mike Hulme. For further details please contact Dr Paul Warde: p.warde@uea.ac.uk.

British Society for Eighteenth-Century studies 38th annual conference

Conference, 6 - 8 January 2009, St. Hugh's College, Oxford

The annual meeting of the British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies is Europe's largest and most prestigious annual conference dealing with all aspects of the history, literature, and culture of the long eighteenth century. It will take place from 6 - 8 January 2009, at St. Hugh's College, Oxford. For further details please see the BSECS conference page.

December 2008

Visual representations of the unemployed

Conference, 12 -13 December 2008, Exeter

The unemployed are one of the most stereotyped social groups in modern society, depicted as dangerous criminals, lazy loafers, prey for political demagogues, completely apathetic, happy scroungers or demoralized and desperate individuals. These stereotypes have been peddled in visual as well as literary sources, and yet the former has attracted little scholarly attention. This conference will examine Western representations of the unemployed in the fine arts, film, photography and cartoons. The event will be led by Matthais Reiss and Andreas Gestrich and held at the University of Exeter. For more information see the German Historical Institute website.

Kristallnacht and its international aftermath

Workshop, 8 December 2008, London

For political historians, the anti-Jewish riots of Kristallnacht (November 1938) raise questions about the international response to violence that remain topical to this day. The looting of shops, burning of synagogues and killing of dozens of innocent civilians in Germany was on the front pages of daily newspapers all over the world. So why was the international response to the outrage, now seen as precursor to genocide, so half-hearted and ineffectual? And why was so little done to help the victims and refugees? These questions still haunt the international community, as it proves equally helpless to contain genocidal violence in Srebrenica, Rwanda and Dafur. The issues raised by Kristallnacht will be reassessed by leading international historians attending a British Academy workshop on Monday 8 December that will focus on both causes and reactions. Were the anti-Jewish riots spontaneous or carefully orchestrated? How can we explain the silence the Christian Churches? How did the pogroms affect Zionist policies in Palestine? Why were British responses towards the desperate plight of the refugees so contradictory? And given that Kristallnacht provoked such critical reactions in the United States, why did American policy towards Nazi Germany remain so ambivalent? Attendance is free but registration is required for this workshop. Further details and an online booking form are available from the website.

November 2008

'Bad Kids'? The politics of childhood past and present

Public discussion, 26 November 2008, London

A discussion to explore the issues affecting young people today, considering how children's lives and the government policies affecting them have changed over time. It will focus on the perception of worsening behaviour amongst young people and involve presentations by secondary school students on media images of young people. The aim is to consider what policy approaches have been tried before, and to discuss how youth policy has changed historically. The event will bring together stakeholders with a wide range of perspectives, from pupils, teachers and academics to youth workers, psychotherapists and legal experts, from organisations as diverse as the Magistrates Youth Courts Committee and Kids Company. This event is organised by the Raphael Samuel History Centre, in partnership with Bishopsgate Institute and History & Policy. It will take place at the Bishopsgate Institute, East London, at 4pm on Wednesday 26th November 2008. For further information please contact Barbara Taylor (B.Taylor@uel.ac.uk).

Getting personal

Conference, 19 November 2008, London

A one-day conference on the role of personal advisers in welfare and related services. This event will offer a mixture of speeches, panel debates and participatory sessions to share policy and best practice. Keynote speakers include Rt Hon James Purnell MP, Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, and Chris Grayling MP, Shadow Secretary of State for Work and Pensions. Read more and book online at the ippr website.

From trade fair to shopping mall: elements of modernity in the three London Olympic Games of 1908, 1948 and 2012

Seminar, 17 November 2008, London

As part of the Sport and Leisure History Seminar series, Professor Garry Whannel of the University of Bedfordshire will be giving this paper on the legacies of London's 1908, 1948 and 2012 Olympics. The sites of the city's previous two Games subsequently suffered years of decline neglect and decay. After the 2012 Olympic Games, for which facilities are currently under construction around Stratford in east London, a vast privately owned shopping mall will become the beneficiary of the massive public investment in infrastructure. This seminar explores the significances that we can read into these events, crossing as they do concepts of nation and internationalism; past and future, heritage and tradition, spectacle and consumption. It is open to all and will be taking place at 17:15pm on Monday 17th November 2008, in the Ecclesiastical History Room of the Institute of Historical Research. For further information contact Dion Georgiou: sportshistory@hotmail.ac.uk.

Feminism and history: rethinking women's movements since 1800

Conference, 15 November 2008, London

This conference aims, on the one hand, to generate an historical perspective on the rise of women's, gender and feminist history within the context of the Women's Liberation movement in the 1970s and 80s. On the other, it hopes to act as a forum in which new approaches to the history of feminism can be discussed and developed. Focusing on women's ideas and struggles since 1800, we aim to develop new insights into both the history of feminism as a social, cultural and intellectual movement; and the past and present writing of feminist historiography. It will take place at the Bishopsgate Institute, London, on 15 November 2008. For further information please see the conference webpage

October 2008

Social work history

Seminar, 20 October 2008, King's College London

The next meeting of the Social Work History Network will take place on 20 October, from 1:30pm - 4:30pm at King's College London. Speakers will explore the emergence of social work roles before 1939 and the history of the Royal Scottish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. For further information please contact Dr Joan Rapaport: joan.rapaport@kcl.ac.uk.

1968 Turning point

Conference, 10 - 11 October 2008, Belfast

1968 was a crucial year in the history and politics of Northern Ireland as the civil rights movement took to the streets, but this agitation was, if anything, defined as much by its global as local character. Forty years on, Queen's University has organised a series of events to reflect upon and re-evaluate the events of 1968 both within and beyond the Northern Irish context. As part of this commemoration Queen's is planning a two-day postgraduate conference entitled '1968 Turning Point', to take place from 10 - 11 October, 2008. Young scholars will give papers on the political, social and cultural significance of 1968 from a wide range of disciplinary and international backgrounds. For further information, please see the call for papers.

Sick of London

Conference, 4 October 2008, London Metropolitan Archives

The Archives for London 2008 conference, Sick of London, will examine London's fascinating medical past. A host of specialist speakers will join archive users, enthusiasts and practitioners in a day which will reveal how medical archives can enrich our research experiences, whether we are an enthusiastic genealogist, dedicated local historian, professional researcher or archives practitioner. Presentations include 'Medical Officers of Health' by Professor Anne Hardy; 'Civil War casualties in London' by Professor Eric Gruber von Arni; 'Medical treatment in hospital and workhouse' by Dr Alysa Levene; 'Surgeons and surgery in London by Beth Astridge; 'Women dentists in 18th and 19th centuries' by Melanie Parker; and 'Great Ormond Street Hospital in-patients' by Sue Hawkins and Juliet Warren. For further details please see the conference webpage.

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September 2008

After empire? Rethinking the post in the postcolonial

Conference, 26 - 27 September 2008, Leeds

The Institute for Colonial and Postcolonial Studies at the University of Leeds is holding a 2-day interdisciplinary conference to rethink the notion of an 'end' of empire. Just how meaningful is it to divide the twentieth century into colonial and postcolonial chapters? And more importantly, how meaningful might it be to think without them? The Institute is looking for papers from across the arts and social sciences. Papers might address both historical and contemporary forms of empire and topics may concern issues around decolonization; memory and nostalgia; migration and diaspora; and the production and movement of knowledge and culture in an age of globalization. Contributions from postgraduate researchers are particularly welcome. Please send 250 word proposals for 20-30 minute papers to Ed Kirby: E.N.Kirby@leeds.ac.uk by 1 July . The conference will take place from Friday 26 - Saturday 27 September at the Leeds Humanities Research Institute. For more information, please visit the Institute's website.

The slave trade, abolition and public memory

Public lecture, 26 September 2008, London

Professor James Walvin will give a Royal Historical Society lecture at 5pm on 26 September at the Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre, University College London. For further details please contact the Royal Historical Society.

What women want: stories from the women's library

Exhibition, 1 May - 27 September 2008, London

90 years on from the award of the parliamentary vote to women, What Women Want: Stories from The Women's Library uses historic photographs, documents, posters and ephemera to bring to life the struggle for political representation and equality at work, and reveal unexpected insights into the worlds of leisure, beauty and the home. The exhibition includes an impressive display of original suffrage banners marking the 100th anniversary of the March of the Great Women, when up to 15,000 women paraded through the streets of London to demand the right to vote. Visitors can also listen to memories of women involved in the suffrage campaigns, originally recorded in the 1970s.

Britain since 1918: The Strange Career of British Democracy

Discussion, 18 September 2008, London

IPPR are hosting this discussion to mark the launch of David Marquand's new book 'Britain since 1918', which tells the story of democratic politics in Britain since 1918. The book digs beneath the surface division between right and left to reveal the deeper traditions which have helped to structure British political debate for more than 200 years. In doing so, Marquand offers a challenging new interpretation of Britain's political culture and identity at the start of the 21st century. As well as describing the turbulent flow of political events, he examines the great tides of long-term change that have swept through the last 100 years - the emergence of the tamed, relatively egalitarian capitalism that reached its apogee under Clement Attlee and Harold Macmillan, and its untaming in the 1980s and 1990s. Against that background he traces the subtle changes of mood and style that led from the sober collectivism of the 1940s, to the impatient romantic revolt of the 1960s, and then to the Tory nationalism of the 1980s and the strange mixture of hyper-individualism, celebrity culture and managed populism that marked the age of New Labour and Tony Blair. Professor David Marquand will be joined by the historian Professor (the Lord) Kenneth Morgan and Philip Stephens, Political Editor of the Financial Times. It will take place from 1:00pm - 2:30pm at IPPR's offices, 30- 32 Southampton Street, London WC2E 7RA. Places at this event are limited. To reserve a place please email events@ippr.org or telephone 020 7470 6138.

History and Memory

Symposium, 15 September 2008, Lancaster

A half-day symposium hosted by the Department of History, Lancaster University. The first session, Mapping Memories: Plurality, Politics and the Making of History, will include papers on 'The Memory of Injustice and the My Lai Massacre', 'Neoliberalism, Memory and Trauma: Chile in the Post-authoritarian Era' and 'Uses and Abuses of Memory - Some Medieval Perspectives'. For further information see the event website or contact John Strachan: j.strachan@lancaster.ac.uk.

Social Policy across Borders: Commonalities, Convergence and Paradoxes in Connectivity, 1850-1975

Conference, 12 - 13 September 2008, Cambridge

Foreign models play a critical role in contemporary debates about social policy. Politicians, journalists and experts frequently cite foreign models when seeking viable alternatives or when merely framing political arguments. The origins and functions of these policy models, however, remain little understood. In the current climate of increasing global connectedness, it is now the time to understand better how and why policy models travel across borders. This conference will explore the widespread domestic, transnational and international communication about social policy since 1850. It will take place at the Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities (CRASSH) from 12 - 13 September. For further details please see the conference webpage.

A Changing House: The Life Peerages Act 1958

Exhibition, 12 June - 26 September 2008, House of Lords, London

'This is about the only place in the kingdom where men can meet without women. For heaven's sake let us keep it like that!' Thus spoke the Earl of Glasgow in the House of Lords in 1957. This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of the Life Peerages Act 1958, which allowed the creation of life peers including women, who were thereby allowed to sit in the House of Lords for the first time. This exhibition highlights original documents from the Parliamentary Archives and works of art from the Palace of Westminster Collections which illustrate the history and achievements of life peers and women in Parliament. Artefacts on display include the Test Roll from 1958 showing the signatures of the first Life Peers, busts of Barbara Castle and the first woman MP Nancy Astor, and a banner unfurled by suffragettes from the Ladies Gallery of the House of Commons in 1908. Visitors can also view newsreel footage of the first televised State Opening of Parliament in 1958. The exhibition website, provides a more detailed examination of the history and documentary material relating to life peers and woman in Parliament. It also has specially commissioned video interviews with five current life peers discussing the significance of the Act and its impact on the House. For further details please see the exhibition website.

Common ground, converging gazes: integrating the social and environmental in history

Conference, 11 - 13 September 2008, Paris

This international conference in Paris will cast an 'environmental gaze' over social history's growing agenda and illuminate how our unsustainable relationships with nature came into being. To see the conference programme Leeds Metropolitan University website or contact Stephen Mosley (s.mosley@leedsmet.ac.uk).

Chasing Eden: nature, health & the politics of environment

Conference, 4 - 5 September 2008, Eden Project & University of Exeter, Cornwall Campus

This two day conference seeks to encourage a conversation between historians of politics and historians of science, medicine, and environment on the topic of environmental politics in the modern era (particularly the nineteenth and twentieth centuries). Among the issues it seeks to address are: the following: What was the role of nature in modern politics? What role did urban public health reform have in the rise of modern environmental politics? When can we say environmentalism/ecologism became a significant political force? Why did 'Green' parties fail? What was distinctive about European environmental politics? How have political parties adapted to environmentalism and issues of environmental justice? What happened to conservation in the age of environment? For further details please see the conference website.

New directions in the history of crime

Symposium, 4 - 5 September 2008, Leeds Metropolitan University

This symposium will explore the past, current and future developments in the history of crime and criminal justice, with papers that address a range of issues relating to topics such as gender, race, empire, policing, violence, social welfare and social policy. It will consider the role of methodology and theory; the impact of the 'cultural turn', public history and the 'digitization' of primary sources; and the relationship between this category of social history and related disciplines such as criminology, law and literature. The symposium will provide a forum for discussion and debate relevant to the history of crime and related disciplines. The call for papers is now closed. If you are interested in attending please register your interest with Pat Cook: p.cook@leedsmet.ac.uk.

History and the healthy population: society, government, health and healthcare

Conference, 3 - 5 September 2008, Glasgow

The Society for the Social History of Medicine conference will consider the value of historical perspectives on issues relating to medicine, health and healthcare. It will take place in Glasgow from 3 - 5 September 2008. For further details, click here.

A world of labour: transnational and comparative histories

Conference, 1 - 3 September 2008, Ulster

Recent years have seen historians moving beyond the nation-state as the principal unit of historical analysis. Contemporary globalisation has helped shape a growing interest in the history of world-wide networks of power, communication and social and economic formation. Within an English-speaking world, the repackaging of aspects of imperial history under the hearding of the 'British World' has added further pressure for global, transnational and comparative histories. This conference aims to explore these issues, with a particular emphasis upon labour and working-class histories. The society wishes to encourage the widest possible definition of labour history and to embrace social, cultural, economic and political approaches to the past. For further information please see the University of Ulster webpage or contact Professor Donald MacRaild d.macraild@ulster.ac.uk.

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July 2008

Cultures in Transit

Conference, 18 - 21 July 2008, Liverpool Hope University

This conference aims to stimulate transcultural and transdisciplinary discussion of the causes and effects of diasporas, cultural displacement, and extensive migration. It will take place in Liverpool from 18 - 21 July 2008. For more information please see the call for papers and contact Dr Terry Phillips (phillim@hope.ac.uk).

Olympic City: London, Britain and the World

Conference, 9 - 11 July 2008, Institute of Historical Research, London

The Centre for Contemporary British History's summer conference will look back at the London Olympics of 1908 and 1948, looking forward to the Games of 2012. The conference will examine the history of the Games in the context of London and British history in the 20th and 21st centuries, and look ahead to the impact of the 2012 Games. For further details please see the CCBH website or contact Virginia Preston (virginia.preston@sas.ac.uk).

Who Cared? Oral History, Caring, Health and Illness: Marking 60 years of the National Health Service

Conference, 4 - 5 July 2008, University of Birmingham

The 2008 conference of the Oral History Society will focus on the development, provision and experience of health care in the twentieth century, to mark 60 years of the NHS. History & Policy founder Virginia Berridge is giving a keynote speech. For further details please see the conference page.

Communication

Conference, 2 - 4 July 2008, Institute of Historical Research, London

Communication is the theme of the Anglo-American Conference 2008, which will take place at the Institute of Historical Research from 2 - 4 July 2008. The conference will consider communication across a broad chronological and geographical range, between and within organisations, states, religions, societies and cultures, with contributions from historians of all places and periods. History & Policy will host a plenary session on 'Communicating History' on Wednesday 2 July. Peter Riddell of The Times, Michael Crick of Newsnight and Chris Bowlby of Radio 4, will consider the topic in light of their extensive experience in print, television and radio journalism. For further details please see the IHR website.

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June 2008

The Children's Act 1908: Centennial Perspectives and Contemporary Reflections

Conference, 30 June - 1 July 2008, University of Kent, Medway

This multi-disciplinary conference will reflect on the historical impact of the 1908 Children's Act which shaped British youth policy for the next century. The participants will also consider its resonance for contemporary pracitioners and engage with current policy relating to children and young people. It is being held at the University of Kent at Medway, from 30 June to 1 July. For further details see the conference flyer or contact Kate Bradley (k.bradley@kent.ac.uk).

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Environmental History: Places or Systems

Conference, 27 June 2008, Open University, Milton Keynes

The European Association for Environmental History (UK Branch) will meet on Friday 27 June at the Open University, Milton Keynes, to discuss approaches to environmental history. Please see the conference flyer for further details. The event is free to attend, but please reserve a place by contacting Raymond Smith (RJSmith@envirohistory.waitrose.com).

Centuries of Celebrity: Re-Contextualizing the Meaning of Fame

Conference, 27th June 2008, University of East London Docklands Campus

Whilst the concept of celebrity has traditionally been perceived as a phenomenon of the twentieth century, this multi-disciplinary conference seeks to reconsider its production and consumption across a broader historical timeframe. Themes for the day include: Global Icons, Mediations, National Heroes, Tabloidization and Representation. For further details please see the University of East London website.

British Labour movement and imperialism

Conference, 26 - 28 June 2008, University of Central Lancashire, Preston

An international, inter-disciplinary conference on the relationships between the British Labour Movement and imperialism, encompassing all sections of the British Labour movement, including trades unionists, socialists and communists. The conference is a major collaboration between the University of Central Lancashire and the People's History Museum based in Manchester. For further details please contact Dr Billy Frank: bfrank@uclan.ac.uk.

Antisemitism and Islamophobia in Europe: comparisons/contrasts/connections

Conference, 22-24 June 2008, University College London

The aim of this conference is to explore the connections, commonalities and differences between Antisemitism and Islamophobia in Europe through a broad geographical and historical lens, from the Crusades to the present day. Papers will focus on contemporary and historical flashpoints, such as Britain, Germany, France, Iberia, Austria, Russia, and the Netherlands. In addition to 'national' case studies, the conference will attempt to gain a broad 'European', transnational perspective on this complex question - or will at least consider whether such a thing can or should be attempted. The conference is supported by the British Academy; Edge Hill University; the Centre for Urban and Community Research, and the Unit for Global Justice, Goldsmiths College, University of London. Keynote addresses will be given by Professor Sander Gilman (Emory), and Professor Ivan Davidson Kalmar (Toronto). For further details please see the conference webpage.

Reconstituting a Traumatized Community: The German-Speaking Refugees of the 1930s and their Legacy to Britain

Workshop and discussion evening, 24 June 2008, British Academy, London

The British Academy is hosting this two-part event on Tuesday 24 June. The afternoon workshop, from 1.30pm to 6.00pm, will reassess the legacy of refugees of the 1930s, considering evidence from the newly created BARGE database. A panel discussion at 7.00pm will consider whether the study of past experiences of immigration and integration can illuminate the topical issues of cultural diversity and social cohesion in Britain today. This event is convened by Professor Edward Timms, OBE, FBA, and organised in partnership with the Centre for German-Jewish Studies, University of Sussex. For further information please see the British Academy website.

Knowing the Past, Shaping the Future: History and the Making of Public Policy

Public discussion on The Security State, 19 June 2008, Bishopsgate Institute, London

Historians Jane Caplan and Edward Higgs will meet with three security experts- Ross Anderson (Security Engineering, Cambridge), Sandra Bell (Royal United Services Institute) and Richard Norton-Taylor (Guardian security correspondent) to explore the rise and rise of the security state and its implications for us today. This is the first in a series of public discussions organised by the Raphael Samuel History Centre in partnership with the Bishopsgate Institute and History & Policy. The discussion will take place at the Bishopsgate Institute, from 7.00 to 9.00pm on Thursday 19 June, 2008. This event is free to attend but seating is very limited so book now to avoid dissapointment. To book a place please email events@bishopsgate.org.uk or ring 020 7392 9220.

Films and the labour movement

Public history seminar, 14 June 2008, St John's College, Oxford

A day of films and discussion including a rare showing of Leeds United from the 1970s. This seminar is organised jointly by St John's College Research Centre and Ruskin College Public History Group. It will take place on Saturday 14 June from 9.30am - 5pm, at St John's College, Oxford and is free to attend. Please reserve a place by 30 May by contacting Professor Linda McDowell (linda.mcdowell@ouce.ox.ac.uk).

Health and Welfare Research Group

Symposium, 13 June 2008, University of Cambridge

The Health and Welfare Research Group at Cambridge is organising a one-day workshop to showcase on-going research by postgraduate and early-career researchers. This interdisciplinary symposium will focus on three themes - 'Classification', 'Identity' and 'The Body'. These strands have been the focus of the Health and Welfare Research Group's seminar programme during the 2007-8 academic year. At the symposium, a keynote lecture by Professor Joanna Bourke (History, Birkbeck College, University of London) will draw these themes together. Further information about the research group and this symposium can be found on its webpage.

Zimbabwe: Hope and History in Collision

Meeting, 11 June 2008, Portcullis House, London

A Ministry for Peace meeting hosted by John McDonnell MP in the Boothroyd Room, Portcullis House, London. The meeting will take place from 7pm to 9pm. The speaker is Simon Fisher, founder of the international agency, Responding to Conflict. For further details please see the Ministry for Peace website or contact diana.basterfield@ministryforpeace.org.

Balzan conference on post-war reconstruction in Europe

Conference, 5-6 June 2008, Birkbeck, University of London

The Balzan Project at Birkbeck College (directed by David Feldman and Mark Mazower) concludes with a final conference on Post-War Reconstruction in Europe. Panels examine different facets of reconstruction after 1944/5, ranging from the timing and chronology of reconstruction, to the impact of Cold War and decolonization on reconstruction agendas. Overall, the conference brings into focus the recent growth of interest in 'the lost decade' after the end of the Second World War. For further details please contact Jessica Reinisch (j.reinisch@bbk.ac.uk).

Britishness, identity and citizenship: the view from abroad

Conference, 5-6 June 2008, University of Huddersfield

The conference seeks to develop understanding of political, social and cultural impact of multi-dimensional constructions of Britishness across the former empire, Europe or other states with strong ties established through patterns of immigration or emigration. It will provide opportunities to discuss the historical legacy of empire and how transnational constructions of Britishness continue to influence national history writing and historiography outside of the UK. For futher details please see the conference website.

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May 2008

Oil and the American Century

Lecture, 22 May 2008, London School of Economics

Professor David S. Painter will examine the role of oil in international history and highlight its geopolitical, economic, and environmental consequences in this IDEAS seminar at the London School of Economics. He teaches international history at Georgetown University in Washington, DC and is currently a Senior Visiting Fellow at the Norwegian Nobel Institute in Oslo. The lecture will be held at 6.30pm, at the IDEAS conference room, Columbia House, London School of Economics. For further information please see the IDEAS website.

1968: Year of Revolutions

Lecture, 22 May 2008, 2pm, National Archives, Kew

The significance of 1968, 40 years on, is currently under intense focus in the media. In this illustrated talk, Mark Dunton, Contemporary Specialist at the National Archives, will take you back in time to a tumultuous year. You can find out more about this free event by visiting The National Archives website.

Governing with History

Parliamentary discussion, 13 May 2008

History & Policy and the All Party Parliamentary History Group are organising this discussion on the use of history in policymaking. The event is hosted by Mark Fisher MP who will be joined by Gill Bennett OBE, former Chief Historian of the FCO, Professor David Cannadine, Rt Hon Peter Lilley MP and Lord (Bill) Rodgers of Quarry Bank. This event is invitation-only as places are very limited. If you are a stakeholder, policymaker or journalist and would like to attend please contact Ruth Evans (ruth.evans@sas.ac.uk).

Britain and Palestine, 1917 - 1948

Lecture, 13 May 2008

Sir Martin Gilbert CBE, official biographer of Winston Churchill, will discuss the British Mandate of Palestine, in light of the forthcoming 60th Anniversary of the declaration of the State of Israel. This event is being held at the Royal United Services Institute for Defence and Security Studies. A limited number of places are available for non-members of RUSI, but those wishing to attend must register in advance. For further information please visit the RUSI website.

Travellers and the State: past and present policy

Parliamentary discussion, 7 May 2008

A discussion on the issues affecting Gypsy and Traveller communities in the present and the past, organised by History & Policy and the All Party Parliamentary Group for Gypsy and Traveller Law Reform. Julie Morgan MP is hosting this event, and speakers include Becky Taylor, author of 'A Minority and the State; Travellers in Britain in the Twentieth Century', Romani journalist Jake Bowers, and Peter Bates from the Gypsy and Traveller Unit, Department for Communities and Local Government. This event is invitation-only as places are very limited. If you are a stakeholder, policymaker or journalist and would like to attend please contact Ruth Evans (ruth.evans@sas.ac.uk).

Moral Marriage, Mistresses and Mayhew: cohabitation and the law in nineteenth-century England

Public lecture, 7 May 2008

Rebecca Probert of Warwick University will examine the prevalence of, and legal and social attitudes to, cohabitation in nineteenth-century England. Her paper will challenge the conventional understanding that cohabitation was popular in the eighteenth century and declined in the nineteenth, arguing that the reverse was in fact the case, and that cohabitation was associated with urbanisation and industrialisation. The lecture will take place at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies on Wednesday 7 May at 6pm. For further details please see the IALS website. If you wish to attend please RSVP to IALS.Events@sas.ac.uk.

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April 2008

Humans & Habitats: rethinking rights in an age of climate change

Conference, 26 April 2008

A public conference exploring opportunities for change and connections between people and the planet, organised by the LSE Centre for the Study of Human Rights, in partnership with Friends of the Earth, Human Rights Watch and the Guardian. The event will take place on Saturday 26 April at the Old Theatre, London School of Economics. For further details please see the conference flyer.

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March 2008

Separation and Silence: Looking Again at the Nineteenth Century Prison

Public lecture, 23 April 2008

Richard Ireland, of Aberystwyth University, will use the nineteenth century debate over the competing penal regimes of "silence" and "separation" as a starting point to consider the obstacles which may stand in the way of recovering important elements of the history of punishment in the period up to prison nationalization under the Act of 1877. This event will take place on Wednesday 23 April 2008, 6pm at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies. It is part of the Issues in Legal History series, and is organised with the London Legal History Seminar and the Institute of Historical Research. To find out more please see the IALS website. If you wish to attend please RSVP to IALS.Events@sas.ac.uk.

Summits- Some 'Lessons' from History

Lecture, 23 April 2008

A lecture by Professor David Reynolds, Professor of International History, University of Cambridge, exploring themes from his recent book and BBC TV series about summit conferences, looking at twentieth century highlights and at some of the broader lessons that can be drawn for statesmen today. This event is being held at the Royal United Services Institute for Defence and Security Studies. A limited number of places are available for non-members of RUSI, but those wishing to attend must register in advance. For further information please visit the RUSI website.

Local devolution of public services: a break with the past or return to the past?

Public discussion evening, 12 March 2008

History & Policy is co-organising this British Academy discussion evening with the Institute of Local Government Studies, University of Birmingham. The discussion brings together historians, local and central government politicians and local government specialists to discuss ways of reviving local democracy. It will take place at the Barber Institute, Birmingham, on Wednesday 12 March 2008 from 7.15 - 8.45pm. This event is free and open to all, to register to attend please contact Fay Wilson (f.e.wilson@bham.ac.uk).

Free Trade Nation

Book Launch, 11 March 2008

Oxford University Press invite you to celebrate the publication of Frank Trentmann's book, Free Trade Nation: Commerce, Consumption, and Civil Society in Modern Britain , on Tuesday 11 March 2008 at 5pm, followed by a drinks reception at 6pm. The launch will be held at the Clore Management Centre (Birkbeck), University of London. Admission is free but spaces are limited. To reserve a place please email events@bbk.ac.uk.

Constitutional Reform - Judges and Parliament

Public Lecture, 10 March 2008

Professor Keith Ewing, Professor of Public Law at King's College London will speak at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies on Monday 10 March 2008, at 6pm. If you wish to attend please RSVP to IALS.Events@sas.ac.uk.

The Pivot of the Twentieth Century

Public Lecture, 4 March 2008

Winston Churchill said in 1945 that "the United States stand at this moment at the summit of the world." Yet just five years earlier America had been an economic catastrophe and an isolationist bastion. How that transformation came about, and its consequences, will be the subject of this lecture. Professor David Kennedy, Stanford University, will speak on Tuesday 4 March at 6:30pm, in the Old Theatre, London School of Economics. This event is part of the IDEAS Gilder Lehrman Public Lecture Series. For more information click here or email events@lse.ac.uk.

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February 2008

The Churchill era and beyond

Conference, 28 February 2008

This postgraduate student conference will examine Britain's relations with the wider world from the mid-nineteenth century to the present day. It will take place at The Churchill Archives Centre, Churchill College, Cambridge, on 28 February 2008. For further details contact Matteo Lodevole (chuarcsc@hermes.cam.ac.uk.

Politicians: A class apart or servants of the people?

Discussion evening, 27 February 2008

Norman Baker MP and Peter Oborne will speak at this Hansard Society event, asking; Are politicians drawn from a self-serving elite? Or are they conscientious representatives of the interest of their constituents? Or do they fall somewhere in between? It will be held in Westminster, starting at 6.30pm on 27 February 2008. To find out more and register, please go to the Hansard Society website.

The Nuts and Bolts of Empire

Public Lecture, 26 February 2008

Professor Paul Kennedy will examine the hard, infrastructural underpinnings of the Roman, Spanish and British Empires, and conclude with some reflections of how today's sole Superpower, the USA, compares in this regard. The lecture will take place on Tuesday 26 February at 6:30pm, in the Old Theatre, London School of Economics. This event is part of the IDEAS-CWSC Public Lecture series and is free and open to all. For more information click here or email events@lse.ac.uk.

Human Rights 1948-2008: Promotion & Protection

9 February 2008

Stefanie Grant, a lawyer specialising in migration and refugee issues, and former head of research at Amnesty International and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights will speak on human rights from 1948 to the present. This event will take place in Conway Hall, Red Lion Square, London at 3pm on 9 February 2008. For more information email mail@networkforpeace.org.uk.

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January 2008

Sinners, scroungers, saints

Exhibition, 17 October 2007 - 29 March 2008

A new exhibition on lone mothers, past and present, is now open at the Women's Library exploring the ways lone mothers have been represented over time. History & Policy contributor Tanya Evans is curator of the exhibition. For more information see the Women's Library website.

Related paper: Is it futile to try to get non-resident fathers to maintain their children?.

Protest and Survive

Exhibition, 14 January - 8 February 2008

An exhibition of Cold War posters, documents and ephemera from the LSE archives focusing on peace movements dating back to the 1940s. The exhibition is on now at the London School of Economics. For more information click here or email events@lse.ac.uk.

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December 2007

Why Policy Needs History

Launch, 5 December 2007

History & Policy had its public launch, Why Policy Needs History, at the Churchill Museum and Cabinet War Rooms on Wednesday, 5 December. Leading historians Pat Thane, David Reynolds and David Cannadine addressed the major policy areas of social change, international relations and national identity and devolution.

Pat Thane's paper, Are things getting better? Governing a changing society [pdf file, 57KB], David Reynolds' paper, The Prime Minister as world statesman [pdf file, 66KB] and David Cannadine's paper, Britishness: devolution, evolution and revolution [pdf file 61kb], are available to download. All of the papers are drafts and have not been checked against delivery.

The launch event also sparked widespread media discussion, including:

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November 2007

Local devolution of public services: a break with the past or return to the past?

27 November 2007

History & Policy has organised this British Academy discussion evening to explore issues raised at our successful workshop in July. History & Policy co-founder Pat Thane will chair a discussion between Local Government Minister John Healey MP, historian Baroness Hollis of Heigham and Guardian Public editor David Walker. This is a public event but registration is required via the British Academy website. For further information, see the British Academy website.

Memory as historical material

24 November 2007

Liz Leicester of Birkbeck and Ruskin Colleges will explore the relationship of memory to the past by looking at a little-known strike of 30,000 Leeds clothing workers in 1970. This Ruskin Public History Group event will take place in Oxford. For further details, see the Ruskin College website.

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October 2007

The future of London: reasons for confidence or concern?

19 October 2007

As part of this year's Bloomsbury Festival, the Centre for Metropolitan History at the Institute of Historical Research has organised a session to explore the turbulent history of London and whether we should be worried about the city's future. On the panel will be Alan Baxter, Senior Partner of the engineering and urban design practice, Alan Baxter & Associates, Derek Keene, Leverhulme Professor of Comparative Metropolitan History at the Institute of Historical Research, Tony Travers, Director of the Greater London Group at the London School of Economics and Jerry White, History & Policy contributor and local government ombudsman. The session will take place from 4.30-5.30pm on Friday 19 October at Goodenough College in central London, admission is free. For further details, see the Bloomsbury Festival website.

War crimes: retrospectives and prospects

26-27 October 2007

This conference will explore arguments that identifying war crimes and their perpetrators is essential to the management of globalisation and a key part of post-conflict resolution. This is a joint initiative between SOLON, the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies and the Centre for Contemporary British History. For further details see the School of Advanced Studies website.

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September 2007

Forty years in British life and politics: does Radio Four really reflect our nation's changing society?

27 September 2007

David Hendy's book, Life on Air: A History of Radio Four, will be launched at a discussion evening with Radio 4 Controller Mark Damazer, historian Peter Hennessy and chaired by Gillian Reynolds. The event will take place at the University of Westminster's Regent Street campus from 6.30pm. To reserve a free ticket contact Foyles Bookshop (events@foyles.co.uk).

Environment, health and history

12-15 September 2007

This international conference at the Centre for History in Public Health in central London aims to approach the interface between environment and health in ways that are sensitive to the past but also speak to present day concerns. The full conference programme is now available and registration is available at a reduced rate until 31st July. For further details see the Centre for History in Public Health website.

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July 2007

Britain and Europe in the twentieth century

11-13 July 2007

The Centre for Contemporary British History's summer conference will examine the ways in which the UK and Europe have interacted in the political, diplomatic, economic, social and cultural spheres. For further details see the Centre for Contemporary British History website.

Non-governmental organisations and politics in contemporary Britain

5-6 July 2007

DANGO (Database of Archives of Non-Governmental Organisations) is holding a conference in Birmingham to explore the role of NGO-based activism in Britain since the Second World War. For further details see the DANGO website.

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June 2007

Sex, life & politics in the British world, 1945-69

28-30 June 2007

King's College London is hosting an international conference to mark 50 years since the publication of the Wolfenden Report on homosexuality and prostitution. History & Policy contributor Jeffrey Weeks will be one of the keynote speakers. For further details see the Wolfenden50 website.

The progressive prison? Historical narratives, contemporary realities

21-22 June 2007

The International Centre for Comparative Criminological Research (ICCCR) at the Open University is now inviting bookings for this major conference on prisons, past and present. For further details see the ICCCR website.

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May 2007

Republicanism and global politics

22-23 May 2007

This conference at the Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities CRASSH), Cambridge University, will bring together political philosophers, historians of political theory, and international relations scholars to address the various ways in which republicanism, from the Renaissance to the contemporary world, has conceived of some of the key issues in inter-polity relations. Topics covered will include war, empire, colonisation, and global justice. For further details see the CRASSH website.

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April 2007

History and the public

12-14 April 2007

This is the latest in a rolling programme of events aiming to explore 'the use of history for public purposes and the involvement of the public in the study and consumption of history'. The conference is being held at Swansea University in conjunction with the Institute of Historical Research and speakers include BBC newsreader Huw Edwards, historian and journalist Tristram Hunt and historian Lord Morgan of Aberdyfi. For further details asee the University of Wales website.

An intimate history of Radio Four

4 April 2007

David Hendy draws on research for his forthcoming book on the history of BBC Radio Four, to examine a shift to more 'intimate' styles in all types of programmes in the 1970s and 1980s. He will explore some of the ethical and aesthetic consequences, for both broadcasters and listeners, of being so 'up-close and personal' on air. This event will take place at the University of Westminster's Harrow Campus from 2.00-4.00pm. For further information contact Mel Porter (mel.porter@sas.ac.uk)

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March 2007

Prostitution: what's going on?

Until 31 March 2007

This Women's Library exhibition marks the centenary of the death of Victorian social reformer Josephine Butler, and explores the issues surrounding prostitution and trafficking, past and present. For further details see the Women's Library website.

In the steps of 'The Medical Detective'

Wednesday 21 March

This Public Health History Walk is organised by the Centre for History in Public Health and funded by the Wellcome Trust. Dr Ros Stanwell-Smith will enable participants to trace the history of the infamous 19th century cholera outbreak, solved by Dr John Snow. For further information contact Ingrid James (ingrid.james@lshtm.ac.uk).

Health and housing in the 19th and 20th and 21st century

Tuesday 20 March 2007

The Women's Library in London is hosting this evening seminar to explore contemporary issues in researching Black and Minority Ethnic Health in historical perspective. History & Policy contributor Jerry White will provide the historical context and Peter Ambrose, Visiting Professor in Housing Studies at the University of Brighton, will address contemporary issues, followed by discussion time. For further information and registration contact Enrico Panizzo (enrico.panizzo@thpct.nhs.uk).

Radical and popular pasts

Saturday 17 March 2007

This conference at Ruskin College in Oxford will explore the nature of radical and popular pasts today, looking at the way in which pasts are presented. Plenary speakers include Turner Prize winner Jeremy Deller and radical film maker Ken Loach. For further details see the Ruskin College website.

Events to mark the bicentenary of the abolition of slavery

March 2007

On Saturday 10 March, the Women's Library in London will be hosting a study day on The transatlantic slave trade: women's roles and experience. Tickets must be bought in advance for this event, for further details see the Women's Library website.

A series of seminars at the Institute of Historical Research (IHR), London, will explore the history of the transatlantic slave trade and its abolition. The series will culminate with a roundtable discussion on public history, memory and the slave trade on Thursday 15 March at 5.30pm. For further details see the IHR website.

For further events in Cambridge in March visit the Centre for African Studies website.

Countries need healthy, courageous citizens

Thursday 8 March

Jessica Reinisch from Birkbeck College will give a seminar at the Centre for History in Public Health on displaced persons, UNRRA and public health in the aftermath of the Second World War. For further information contact Ingrid James (ingrid.james@lshtm.ac.uk).

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February 2007

Lesbian Gay Bisexual Trans History Month

February 2007

Conferences, exhibitions, speaker events, cultural and educational activities will be taking place all over the country throughout February to celebrate LGBT History Month, 2007. For further details see the LGBT History Month website. Highlights include historical walking tours of lesbian and gay Soho every Sunday, a talk and book-signing by historian Matt Houlbrook in London and a Queer History study day at the Museum of London, both on Friday 23 February.

Events to mark the bicentenary of the abolition of slavery

February 2007

On Friday 16 February, Magdalene College, Cambridge, is holding a one-day symposium on 'Slavery Past and Present', with speakers including UN Deputy Secretary-General Sir Mark Malloch-Brown and BBC World Affairs Editor John Simpson. For further details see the Magdalene College website.

On Saturday 17 February, St John's College, Cambridge, is hosting a conference, 'Campaigning Then and Now', with speakers including Dr Boyd Hilton. For further details see the St John's College website.

There will also be guided walks around sites connected with Abolition in Cambridge over this weekend, as well as other events during February and March. For a full calendar of events in Cambridge, see the events programme [pdf file, 186KB].

Hospitals and the patient experience: architecture, art, music and treatment

Friday 16 February 2007

This is the fourth conference of the International Network for the History of Hospitals, in collaboration with the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at University College London. For further details see the conference website.

Why history matters

12-13 February 2007

This conference at the Institute of Historical Research (IHR) will address why history is important to education and national life in the early twenty-first century. It will enable a dialogue between policy makers, educationalists and practitioners at all levels. It is hoped that the discussions will influence and, if possible, suggest answers to current debates on what history should be taught and how. For further details see the IHR website.

The challenge of affluence

Thursday 1 February 2007

The Modern Economic History Seminar in Cambridge provides a forum for discussion of new research papers from historians in the field. This paper will be delivered by Avner Offer (Oxford University), with comments from Frank Trentmann (Birkbeck College, London) and Bernhard Rieger (University College, London). For further information contact Simon Szreter (srss@cam.ac.uk).

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December 2006

Experiencing the law

Friday 1 December 2006

The government is keen to address public dissatisfaction with the courts and legal process. This one-day conference will provide a historical perspective on ordinary people's experiences of the legal system, in particular the summary courts. This event is organised by the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies and the Centre for Contemporary British History at the University of London, in conjunction with SOLON (interdisciplinary studies in bad behaviour and crime). For further details see the School of Advanced Studies website.

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November 2006

The end of history or a last, best chance to save it?

Friday 24 November 2006

The first meeting of Rescue!History, a new group of historians and others working in the humanities, aiming to connect their research to the current realities of climate change. For more information about Rescue!History see the Crisis Forum website or contact Mark Levene (m.levene@soton.ac.uk).

NGOs, voluntarism and health

Wednesday 22 November 2006

A workshop organised by the Centre for History in Public Health covering hospital governance, health consumer groups and NGOs, followed by a reception to launch Financing medicine: the British experience since 1750, edited by Martin Gorsky and Sally Sheard, and Making health policy: networks in research and policy after 1945, edited by Virginia Berridge. For further details see the Centre for History in Public Health website.

Westminster: an 'inextinguishable torch': the history of parliament in modern times

Tuesday 21 November 2006

A History of Parliament Lecture by David Cannadine, of the Centre for Contemporary British History, at 6.00pm in the Attlee Suite, Portcullis House. For tickets contact Sophie Allen (sallen@histparl.ac.uk).

The social contract of health in the 20th and 21st centuries: individuals, corporations and the state

Thursday 16 November 2006

Dorothy Porter of the University of California delivers the Centre for History in Public Health Annual Lecture at 50, Bedford Square. For further details see the Centre for History in Public Health website or contact Ingrid James (ingrid.james@lshtm.ac.uk).

'The right of registration' and social security in Britain and the world

Thursday 2 November 2006

The Modern Economic History Seminar in Cambridge provides a forum for discussion of new research papers from historians in the field. This paper will be delivered by Simon Szreter, one of History and Policy's founding members. For further details contact Simon Szreter (srss@cam.ac.uk).

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October 2006

Consumerism and the welfare state

Friday 27 October 2006

The Centre for Contemporary British History (CCBH) is hosting a witness seminar on consumerism in health, education and housing under the Conservative government, 1987-1992. Witness seminars bring together those who participated in a recent historical event to discuss their recollections. For further details see the CCBH website or contact Liza Filby (liza.filby@sas.ac.uk).

The 1906 general election

Saturday 21 October 2006

The landslide victory of the Liberal party in the general election of 1906 ushered in a period of radical reform and rapid social and constitutional change. This conference in Cambridge brings together politicians and academics to discuss the impact and long-term significance of one of the key political events in twentieth-century British history. For further details see the conference web page.

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Events