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History and Journalism

This event took the form of an online round-table discussion focusing on the connections between History and print Journalism and how each field can benefit from collaborating with the other. The event aims to bring together practitioners from both fields, especially those with experience of bridging the divide. Our distinguished panellists aim to address the following questions:  

  1. Philip L. Graham, former President and Publisher of the Washington Post said, “Journalism is the first rough draft of history.” What does this mean in practice and what similarities and differences are there between the work of the historian and the journalist? 
  2. History-making is a recurrent theme in today’s journalism, with frequent resort to words like ‘historic’ and ‘unprecedented’. To what extent does this suggest a genuine interaction with History, and does it risk distorting our understanding of the past? 
  3. Could both journalists and historians benefit from acquiring some of each other’s professional skills? 
  4. Journalists are increasingly drawn to so-called 'culture war' topics - legacies of slavery, statues, national memory/ identity, gender/ sexual identities etc: how should historians engage with this and what are the dangers of being drawn into polarised or stereotyped positions, or even becoming the target of attacks?


Chair: Philip Murphy (Director of History & Policy).

Confirmed Speakers:

  • Alan Rusbridger (Formerly editor-in-chief of The Guardian and Principal of Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, he currently serves on Meta’s Oversight Board).
  • Anna Whitelock (Historian. Executive Dean of the School of Communication and Creativity, and Director of the Centre for the Study of Modern Monarchy, City University of London)
  • Adrian Bingham (Director of Sheffield University’s Centre for the Study of Journalism and History).
  • Simon Heffer (Historian, journalist, author and political commentator).
Categories:

Corruption and Standard in British Politics

Corruption and Standard in British Politics: The launch of The Many Lives of Corruption: The reform of public life in modern Britain c. 1750-1950 edited by Ian Cawood & Tom Crook

How has corruption shaped - and undermined - the history of public life in modern Britain? We take this new collection of essays as the starting point for an examination of this question. It will consider two and a half centuries of history, from the first assaults on Old Corruption and aristocratic privilege during the late eighteenth century through to the corruption scandals that blighted the worlds of Westminster and municipal government during the twentieth century. And it will reflect on the emergence of the concept of standards of governance in modern Britain and identify potential parallels between the challenges of the era which the book covers and those facing UK politics today.

Joining the editors Dr Ian Cawood (University of Stirling) and Dr Tom Crook (Oxford Brookes University) to discuss the book was:

  • Anneliese Dodds MP (Shadow Secretary of State for Women and Equalities)
  • John Penrose MP (United Kingdom Anti-Corruption Champion at the Home Office 2017-2022)
  • Prof Mark Knights (University of Warwick. Specialist in the history of corruption in Early Modern Britain)
  • Dr Kathryn Rix (Assistant Editor, House of Commons 1832-1945, History of Parliament)

This event was chaired by Professor Philip Murphy, Director of History & Policy.


Voting reform 150 years on from the 1872 Ballot Act | A symposium at the IHR in honour of Valerie Cromwell

2022 marks the 150th anniversary of the passing of the 1872 Ballot Act which introduced the requirement for a secret ballot in British parliamentary and local elections. Our symposium will take this as the starting point for a broader examination of the history of voting reform. It will consider the culture and conduct of Victorian elections and the circumstances that led to the passing of the Act; it will deal with the debates around the secret ballot, the impact of the Act at home (especially in Ireland), its influence abroad, and the subsequent history of electoral administration, relating some of these issues to currently debated questions of electoral fraud and voter identity.


The symposium seeks to bring together historians, political scientists and representatives from organisations such as the Electoral Commission and the UK Boundary Commissions. It is being held in honour of Valerie Cromwell who was Reader in History at the University of Sussex and Director of the History of Parliament Trust between 1991 and 2001. It is being jointly organised by History & Policy at the IHR and the History of Parliament, and has been made possible thanks to a generous donation by Lady Valerie’s husband, Sir John Kingman.


Trade Union Education - History and Future

his seminar will explore the history of Trade Union Education - both learning for activists and broader learning for members. It will discuss current issues and how to shape future Trade Union Learning. It aims to guide the planning for a much larger all-day conference in early February 2023. 

Join us for a lively debate on a highly topical area. The loss of the Union Learning Fund and almost all Trade Union Education funding was of course deplorable. On the other hand, the Unison College shows the appetite for growth and new ideas. There is almost universal agreement that UK skills are comparatively low, yet government funding in Adult Education and employer investment in skills remain completely inadequate. The Pandemic has shown the capability of online learning, helping thousands of Union members and activists to access education, including many women and others who might previously have found it difficult to find time to travel to a classroom - but is this at the cost of face to face solidarity? What is the role for Unions in their members’ education?

ChairProfessor John Holford of Nottingham University who will both Chair and provide an initial historical overview, looking at the key issues including the role of employers, funding from government, the Trade Union Curriculum, the role of the TUC and meeting the needs of a rapidly changing trade Union membership. 

Speakers:

  • Teresa Donegan (Head of Learning at Unison)
  • Kevin Rowan (Head of Organising, Services and Learning at the TUC)
  • John Lloyd (Academic and former Trade Union National Education Officer)

The Reunion- Celebrating Twenty Years of History & Policy

Twenty years since its foundation in 2002, History & Policy welcomes back its founding members, Simon Szreter, Pat Thane, Alastair Reid and Virginia Berridge, as well as the key figures in the subsequent development of the network, including Mel Porter, Lucy Delap, Andrew Blick and Philip Murphy. This event will follow the format of the Radio 4 series ‘The Reunion’, as founding members discuss the aims behind H&P, its achievements over the past two decades and its plans for the future. Over the course of two panel discussions and a drinks reception H&P will examine its past, present and future, and give thanks to the network of members whose contributions and engagement have made it all possible. 

Programme

Welcome Claire Langhamer (Director of the Institute of Historical Research) & Opening Remarks Sir Anthony Seldon
 

Session 1: History & Policy - The idea, its origins, and the launch of the website

ChairPhilip Murphy (Current H&P Director)
SpeakersPat Thane, Simon Szreter, Alastair Reid and Virginia Berridge (Co-Founders).


Session 2: Building the institution and its activities


ChairSimon Szreter (Co-Founder and Editorial Director).
SpeakersDuncan Needham, Mel Porter, Lucy Delap, Andrew Blick, Fiona Holland and Chris Williams (Deputy Director and Senior Associates).

Closing remarks


Page 1 of 10 pages

About Us


H&P is based at the Institute of Historical Research, Senate House, University of London.

We are the only project in the UK providing access to an international network of more than 500 historians with a broad range of expertise. H&P offers a range of resources for historians, policy makers and journalists.

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