New books

H&P historians reflect on the process of historical research and writing, what they discovered and the relevance of their findings for policy - whether at international, national or local levels.

Registration and Recognition. Documenting the Person in World History

The Politics of Expertise - How NGOs Shaped Modern Britain by Matthew Hilton

Encouraged by students seeking alternatives to traditional social history, Matthew Hilton and colleagues charted the growth and ascendency of NGOs, their influence, impact - and limitations. By examining three key civil society concerns - environmentalism, humanitarian aid and development, and homelessness - the authors consider how NGOs and people's marginalisation from traditional politics has changed the ways in which 21st century Britons engage with the world.

Article published: February 2014

Registration and Recognition. Documenting the Person in World History

Registration and Recognition. Documenting the Person in World History edited by Keith Breckenridge and Simon Szreter

New technologies of civic identity registration are a major global policy innovation. Keith Breckenridge and Simon Szreter introduce new discoveries about the history of these official and legal recognition systems, which can date back centuries and have been established in East and West. They discuss the policy implications of this diverse and original research.

Article published: December 2013

Hyperactive: The Controversial History of ADHD

Hyperactive: the controversial history of ADHD by Matthew Smith

Matthew Smith explains how he was motivated to write a history of hyperactivity and discusses what his research can add to present-day debates about its diagnosis and treatment, and the nature of modern childhood.

Article published: January 2013

Wales since 1939

Wales since 1939 by Martin Johnes

Martin Johnes discusses how he approached the history of Wales since 1939, studying it as both a 'complex and contradictory' nation in its own right, and also as a witness and participant to the events and changes that shaped the UK and the wider world in the twentieth century.

Article published: October 2012

Governing Post-War Britain

Governing Post-War Britain by Glen O'Hara

Glen O'Hara explores the paradoxes of governing post-war Britain. Why, he asks, when living standards rose so markedly, did voters accord politicians with so little credit for their new-found prosperity?

Article published: October 2012

Sinners? Scroungers? Saints? Unmarried motherhood in twentieth century England

Sinners? Scroungers? Saints? Unmarried motherhood in twentieth century England by Pat Thane and Tanya Evans

In this groundbreaking new study, Pat Thane and Tanya Evans challenge many of the stereotypes and historical myths that are prevalent in present-day media and policy discussion about unmarried mothers. Co-author Pat Thane explains that, far from being a creation of the 'permissive 1960s', unmarried mothers were both more prevalent, and more diverse, than is often assumed.

Article published: June 2012

The Big Society Debate: a New Agenda for Social Welfare?

The Big Society Debate: a New Agenda for Social Welfare? edited by Armine Ishkanian and Simon Szreter

There is a long transatlantic intellectual history of ideas, akin to 'the Big Society', stretching back at least to Adam Smith. Today's 'Big Society' policies draw on institutions and activities that have a long history in Britain. To explore the implications of that history for civil society and welfare provision today, historians and social policy scholars have collaborated on a new book.

Article published: June 2012

Science in the Twentieth Century

Science in the Twentieth Century and Beyond by Jon Agar

Jon Agar's global history of science raises significant intellectual dilemmas not easily captured by historical case studies. Should the social sciences be included alongside the physical and life sciences? How to integrate national stories of scientific development into a global narrative of change? In answering such questions, Agar came to two conclusions with policy implications that historians can assist with.

Article published: June 2012

The British People and the League of Nations

The British People and the League of Nations by Helen McCarthy

Helen McCarthy considers the challenges of balancing foreign policy imperatives and democratic practices through the lens of the League of Nations Union (LNU). As one of the largest voluntary organisations of its time, the LNU promoted international cooperation, arguing that foreign affairs should be within the purview of all citizens. But as McCarthy's new book suggests, there are limitations to such campaigns when it comes to foreign policy.

Article published: June 2012

Titanic: The Last Night of a Small Town

Titanic: The Last Night of a Small Town by John Welshman

John Welshman reconstructs the Titanic disaster through the personal stories of 12 passengers and crew members.

Article published: April 2012

Eco-Republic

Eco-Republic by Melissa Lane

Melissa Lane, Melissa Lane, Professor of Politics at Princeton University, considers what it would mean for societies and ourselves if we dared to leave Plato's 'cave of illusion.'

Article published: November 2011

History, Historians and Development Policy: A Necessary Dialogue

History, Historians and Development Policy: A Necessary Dialogue by C. A. Bayly, Vijayendra Rao, Simon Szreter and Michael Woolcock (eds)

Simon Szreter, H&P Partner and Fellow of St John's College Cambridge, looks at the contribution history has to make to development policy - and its potential to turn some key policy precepts on their head. This book was launched in Manchester.

Article published: September 2011

Contested Common Land

Contested Common Land by Christopher P. Rodgers, Eleanor A. Straughton, Angus J.L. Winchester and Margherita Pieraccini

Angus Winchester, Senior Lecturer at Lancaster University, charts his journey through the medieval and early modern land use of upland northern England to debates about the sustainable management of common land in the 21st century.

Article published: August 2011

An Alternative History of Hyperactivity: Food Additives and the Feingold Diet, by Matthew Smith

An Alternative History of Hyperactivity: Food Additives and the Feingold Diet by Matthew Smith

Dr Matthew Smith, Wellcome Trust Research Fellow Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare University of Strathclyde, talks about his upcoming book An Alternative History of Hyperactivity - explaining why the argument matters and what it means for future health policy.

Article published: May 2011

The African Diaspora in Asian Trade Routes and Cultural Memories, by Shihan de Silva Jayasuriya

The African Diaspora in Asian Trade Routes and Cultural Memories by Shihan de Silva Jayasuriya

Dr Shihan de Silva Jayasuriya, Senior Fellow at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies in London, talks about the context for her new book The African Diaspora in Asian Trade Routes and Cultural Memories - and how she went about compiling the information behind it.

Article published: May 2011

Sex before the Sexual Revolution, by Simon Szreter and Kate Fisher

Sex before the Sexual Revolution: Intimate Life in England 1918-1963 by Simon Szreter and Kate Fisher

The new professor of History and Public Policy, Simon Szreter and Dr Kate Fisher offer personal reflections on the motivation and rationale behind their new book Sex before the Sexual Revolution.

Article published: October 2010

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